Biographies Ca-Cn

 

Anthony Caldwell William Cation
Ira Callender Charles Chamberlain
William S. Cameron George Churchill
Rev. Stuart Campbell George B. Churchill
Rev. Thomas Camp Charles Clark
William Carlton Frank Nelson Clark
John Carns George Clark
Colonel Clark E. Carr Salina E. Clark
David Cation Albert Cline

 


Anthony W. Caldwell is a successful farmer and a representative citizen of Knox County, whose homestead lies on section 30 and who is the son of John and Mary (Baird) Caldwell, both natives of Pennsylvania. They came to Knox County from Pennsylvania in 1839 and settled in Persifer Township among other pioneers, and from its infancy have watched the growth of the county as it assumed larger and larger proportions and its boundaries extended farther, until she stands to-day one of the most populous and prosperous counties of Illinois.
     Mr. Caldwell is the third child in order of birth of a family of nine, and was born in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, 30 August 1824. He was 15 years of age when he came to Knox County with his parents, and attending the common schools, gained a moderately good education. He remained at home until he attained the age of 24 years, when he made up his mind to take a trip to California, and in 1850 started across the plains. He was absent from home almost two years, and returning to Knox County, remained only a short time and again went back to the land of gold. In the fall of 1856, his heart again sought the familiar scenes of his youth, and he set his face eastward, this time remaining contentedly at home until 1862, when he again went to the Golden State, and tarried for a period of 15 months. After this interval had elapsed he came back to Persifer Township, where he has since been engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was a miner while in California and met with moderate success. He is now the owner of 159 acres in Persifer Township, in which section of the country he was married 10 December 1857, to Sarah M. Manley, daughter of George W. and Lucretia (Weed) Manley, natives of Massachusetts and New York, respectively. They came to Knox County in 1838 from Chautauqua County, New York, and settled in Persifer Township, where they passed the remainder of their days and were there buried. They were the parents of seven children, of whom Mrs. C. was the youngest. She was born in Chautauqua County on 16 August 1831 and is the mother of five children, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are John W., William, residing in Knox County, where he is engaged in farming, and Charles A. still under the paternal roof.
     Mr. Caldwell takes some interest in pubic matters and casts his vote with the Democratic party.  (Portrait & Biographical Album of Knox County, Illinois, pub. in 1886, pages 600-601, submitted by Pat Thomas)

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Rev. Stuart M. Campbell, D. D. – One of the strongest forces in the moral development and progress of Galesburg is the First Presbyterian Church, of which Dr. Stuart M. Campbell is the pastor.  Thoroughly versed in the church doctrines and in the principles of theology, he has, too, that broad human sympathy which enables him to reach out in helpful spirit toward all whom he seeks to influence in their choice of the things in life that are most worth while.  He first became connected with Galesburg during his college days, for he was a student at Knox.  Later his work called him to various other fields and in June, 1907, he returned to this city to accept his present pastorate.
     Dr. Campbell is of Canadian birth, a native of the province of Ontario. He was born July 13, 1859, being one of the twelve children of Thomas and Margaret (McAlpine) Campbell, natives of Edinburgh, Scotland.  The former was a son of Thomas Campbell, who lived at Thurso, Scotland, where his son Thomas was born.  He was a stonecutter thus providing for his family, which numbered three sons and one daughter.  The maternal grandfather of Dr. Campbell was Thomas McAlpine, a native of Prestonpans, Scotland.  Both he and his wife lived to a ripe old age and reared a large family.
     Thomas Campbell, the father of Dr. Campbell, spent his youthful days at Edinburgh, Scotland, where he became a merchant tailor.  He crossed the Atlantic to Canada when forty years of age and lived for some time at Picton and at Galt, Ontario, but is now living retired in Toronto, at the venerable age of ninety years.  He is a Presbyterian in religious faith, as was his wife, who died in 1896, at the age of about sixty-five years.  In their family were seven sons and five daughters, of whom nine reached adult age: John; Thomas; Jessie, the wife of George W. Scott of Toronto; James; Margaret, the wife of William McMaster of Toronto; Walter; Charles, deceased; Agnes, the wife of J. H. G. Russell of Winnipeg, Canada; and Stuart M.  Three daughters of the family died in infancy.
     Dr. Campbell spent his youthful days in his native country, leaving Picton at the age of ten years to become a resident of Galt, where he was reared to manhood and acquired his preliminary education.  He afterward devoted several years to the newspaper and printing business in Galt and then crossed the border to seek opportunities of this country, where competition is greater but where advancement is more quickly secured.  He made his way to Chicago where he worked as a printer until 1884.  Realizing the fact that intellectual progress must constitute the basis for success in professional lines, he then entered Knox College in the fall of that year and was graduated with the class of 1888.  In the meantime he had determined to enter upon the active work of the ministry and with that end in view became a student in the McCormick Theological Seminary of Chicago, in which he remained for a year.  He afterward spent two years in the Princeton Theological Seminary of New Jersey and was graduated in May, 1891.  Ordained to the ministry, he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Lyons Farms, near Newark, New Jersey, where he continued until the fall of 1894, when he accepted the pastorate of the Emerald Avenue Presbyterian Church of Evanston, Illinois, and in June, 1907, came to Galesburg as minister of the First Presbyterian Church of this city with which he has since been identified.
     On the 10th of September, 1889, Dr. Campbell was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Miss MARTHA EUNICE KENT, who was born in Akron, Ohio, a daughter of Oscar and Charity Kent, who were likewise natives of the Buckeye state and resided upon a farm near Akron.  There her father died a number of years ago and her mother passed away in Chicago in 1909, at the age of seventy-eight years.  They were members of the Christian Church and they had a family of two sons and four daughters, George, William, Cordelia, Alice, Martha, and Mary.  Four children have been born unto Dr. and Mrs. Campbell, Gladys M., Helen, Stuart M., and Marion K.  During the four years of Dr. Campbell’s pastorate here he has carefully systematized the work and the different societies and organizations of the church are now in a flourishing condition.  He is an earnest, logical,  and effective speaker, a deep student not only of the Bible but of humanity as well, and is thus able to make of his teachings a practical force for good in the lives of those who come under his ministry.  (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 546-547, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Professor William Blake Carlton. William Blake Carlton, teacher of voice and head of the musical history and sight-singing department of the Knox Conservatory of Music at Galesburg, was born at Versailles, Tennessee, November 15, 1873. He was a son of William and Nancy Virginia (Williams) Carlton and a grandson of Blake and Mary (Walker) Carlton. The family comes of English ancestry and the name was originally spelled Carleton. Blake Carlton, a native of North Carolina, was a farmer by occupation and met an accidental death when about forty Thomas and Minos. The maternal grandparents of William Blake Carlton were James G. and Phoebe (Spence) Williams, the former born in Brunswick county, Virginia, May 2, 1812. He was of German descent and during his active life followed farming and blacksmithing. He reached the venerable age of eighty-six years while his wife was seventy-eight years of age at the time of her death. They had five children, who lived to maturity, as follows: Nelson, Elizabeth, Nancy Virginia, Adna and Enoch.
    Both William and Nancy Virginia Carlton were natives of Tennessee and the former, who was reared in Rutherford county of that state, still makes his home there, having devoted his entire life to general agricultural pursuits. At the time of the Civil war he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and went to the front as a private of Company A, Twenty-fourth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. Following the cessation of hostilities he took the oath of allegiance to the United States government. In community affairs he has been somewhat active, serving for one term as tax assessor and for many years as a member of the school-board, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart friend. He is a member of the Primitive Baptist church while his wife holds membership in the Presbyterian church. Of their family of seven children three were sons and four were daughters, as follows: Mary, the wife of Andrew Jackson, of Murfreesboro, Tennessee; Adna, the widow of Charles H. Hale, residing near Versailles, Tennessee; Elizabeth, who married Jasper W. Jackson, of Nashville, Tennessee; William Blake, of this review; Nelson Clay, of Spring­field, Tennessee; Ella, the wife of W. Freeland Jackson, of Eagleville, Tennessee; and Dr. John D., of Union City, Tennessee. William Carlton was twice married, his first wife having been Sarah Spence, by whom he had two children, of whom one reached adult age, James F., now of Brownwood, Texas, while the other died in infancy.
    William Blake Carlton was reared in Rutherford county, Tennessee, spend­ing his youthful days upon his father's farm, in the vicinity of which was received his English education in the district schools of that county and at Haley, Tennessee. When eighteen years of age he started out in the world on his own account by clerking in a general store and later was connected with a grocery house in Springfield, Tennessee, for seven years in the capacity of salesman. He then became one of the proprietors of that establishment in partnership with his brother Nelson Clay, under the firm style of Carlton Brothers, which business association was maintained for five years. On the expiration of that period he came to Galesburg and pursued a course in Brown's Business College. He recognized the fact that nature had endowed him with a good singing voice and he was ambitious to develop his talents in that direction, so that he entered the Knox Conservatory of Music, pursuing the full course and graduating with the class of 1908. He taught for a year and a half, instructing such pupils as could not be accommodated in the college, beginning this work in 1907. In September. 1908. he became a regular teacher of voice in Knox College and the following year was made head of the department of musical history and sight reading. In this connection he is proving not only that he has musical talent himself, but that he also has ability as an instructor. his pupils making rapid and substantial progress under his direction in propor­tion to their talent.   
    On the 18th of June, 1902, Mr. Carlton was married to Miss Ellen Kendall Avery, who was born in Galesburg, March 9, 1881. Her parents, Robert H. and Sarah (Ayers) Avery, were also natives of Illinois and in this state her father died in 1892 and her mother in 1898. They were the parents of six children, Minnie, Fred, Sarah, Cornelia, Ellen and Elizabeth. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Carlton was George Avery, one of the pioneer residents of Knox county and a charter member of the Congregational church of Galesburg.
    Her maternal grandparents were Thomas N. and Sarah Ayers, whose family numbered the following, named: Cornelia, Sarah, Jessie, Abbie, Fannie, George, Henry, James and Nelson. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Carlton have been born three daughters, Margaret E., Esther A. and Sarah Jean. The parents are both members of the Congregational church and in Galesburg they are widely and favorably known, Mrs. Carlton having spent her entire life here, while Professor Carlton has gained an extensive acquaintance during the period of his residence in this city. His work is recognized as a valuable factor in upholding the standard of the departments with which he is connected, and his own love for and enthusiastic interest in music does much to inspire his pupils and to promote musical culture and taste in this city. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 378-380, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Charles S. Clark. One of the most extensive landowners and successful agriculturists of Victoria township is Charles S. Clark, who in addition to the duties connected with the operation of his extensive acreage is officially connected with a number of the leading banking institutions of Knox county. He is a native of New York, his birth occurring in Roxbury, Delaware county, on the 4th of June, 1835, and the eldest son of Job W. and Hepsey (Woods) Clark, while his paternal grandfather was Hazard Clark. The father was born in Berkshire, Massachusetts, on the 7th of July, 1812, while the mother was a native of Roxbury, her birth occurring in 1815. In his early manhood Job W. Clark came to New York, locating in Roxbury, where on the 13th of July, 1834, he was united in marriage to Miss Woods. There they spent the early years of their domestic life, but in 1855 they came west, and in December of that year settled in the village of Victoria. Mr. Clark subsequently purchased a quarter section of land west of there, known as the Mound farm. Later he and his wife removed to an eighty-acre tract in Victoria township, and there he passed away on the 24th of January, 1884, his wife surviving until the 13th of October, 1886, when her death occurred on the home farm. Both were laid to rest in the cemetery at Victoria. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Clark there were born six children, the eldest of whom is Charles S., of this sketch. William Perry, who was born on June 11, 1839, now residing in Talmage, Nebraska, married Adaline Hines, a native of Victoria, from whom he was subsequently divorced. Of this marriage there were born three children: Carrie Augusta, who is deceased; Charles Perry; and William Bird, who is also deceased. On the 12th of March, 1887, he was married to Mary Peterson, also of Victoria, and they have three children: Marion Caroline; Ella May; and Mary Louise. Marian A., whose birth occurred on February 14, 1846, married Charles D. Sornborger, who was born in Victoria on the 26th of October, 1843. Their marriage occurred on the 12th of April, 1870, and on the 5th of March, seven years later, she passed away and was buried in the cemetery at Victoria. Unto them there were born three sons: Clifford Ford, whose natal day was the 12th of June, 1871; Clyde Wilson, born on July 24, 1874; and Earl Charles, who was born on August 13, 1877, and died on the 8th of April, 1878. Judson E., the fourth in order of birth of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Job W. Clark, was born in February, 1848, and died in 1850. Sarah Ella was born on Christmas day, 1850, and on the 29th of March, 1871, she was married to Elmer C. Powell, of Springfield, Ohio, whose natal day was November 1, 1849. Unto them were born the following children: Osborne Wayne, Augusta, Maurice Clark. Mabel Marion, Mildred Bell, Reed McKinley and Sybil Marie. Luman Reed was united in marriage on the 23d of May, 1884, to Matilda R. Cummings, who was born on the 14th of June, 1859, and she died in Kansas on the 20th of March, 1894. Of this marriage there were born five children, Arthur Wilcox, Nellie Belle, Charles, John Gilmore and Luman Reed, Jr.
    Charles S. Clark was educated in the common schools of his native state, where he spent the first twenty years of his life. After the family removed to Victoria he began his independent business career, and for two years thereafter clerked in Whitting & Copley's mercantile establishment. Much of his life having been spent on a farm, he was thoroughly familiar with agricultural pursuits, and as this vocation seemed to afford better opportunities of advancement than commercial lines he left the store and the succeeding two years devoted to farming. In 1860 he made a trip to the mining sections of Colorado, making the journey with a team and wagon. There he secured a gold claim and spent eight months in prospecting. At the expiration of that period he returned to Victoria and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres a mile east of town.
    He subsequently disposed of this property and bought the place where he is now living, located on the east side of the north and south road in section 7, Victoria township, containing one hundred and thirty acres of fertile land, that is well improved and carefully kept up. In the operation of his fields Mr. Clark has always manifested the intelligence and capability that characterizes the successful business man in any line of activity, and as a result he has been unusually prosperous. Well tilled and carefully cultivated land, where all other conditions are favorable, invariably responds to the attention bestowed upon it by yielding abundant harvests, and such has been the experience of Mr. Clark, who annually realizes a handsome dividend from his fields. In connection with diversified farming he raises stock, and this branch of his business has also proven to be very remunerative. As his means have warranted he has added to his holdings until he now owns eleven hundred acres of land, all of which is under cultivation. With the exception of two eighty-acre tracts that are located in Copley township, all of his land is in Victoria township. All of the buildings now standing on his homestead have been erected during the ownership of Mr. Clark, with the exception of the residence. He has large, substantially constructed barns and outbuildings for his stock, which is of a good grade, and ample provision is also made for the protection of his grains and farming implements.
    On the 21st of March, 1861, Mr. Clark was married to Miss Almina C. Hedstrom, who was born at Farmington, Illinois, on the 12th of October, 1840, and passed away on the farm, where Mr. Clark now resides on November 5, 1887, of typhoid fever. She is buried in the cemetery at Victoria. Her father was a Swedish minister and her mother a sister of Anson Sornborger, formerly of Worcester, Oswego county, New York. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Clark there were born five children. Irwin J., who is the eldest, was born on the 23(1 of September, 1862, and died on October 5, 1888. Mary Lois, who was born on the 19th of May, 1864, married Newton C. Robbins, of Copley township, and they have nine children, Glenn, Maurine, Edith, Eva, Reuben, Stewart, Howard, Jean and Lucille. Charles Delbert, who was born on November 14, 1866, and died in April, 1898, married Nettie Doak, this event occurring on the 5th of November, 1895. Unto them were born two sons, John Stewart and Charles Doak. On the 24th of April, 1900, Mrs. Charles Delbert Clark passed away and was laid to rest beside her husband in the cemetery at Victoria. She was a daughter of John and Janet Doak, of Oneida, Illinois.        
    Both Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Clark were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He always took an active interest in all political affairs, his allegiance being given to the republican party, and he held a number of township offices. Jennie Becker was born on the 29th of September, 1869, and makes her home with her father. She is a member of the Congregational church. John Perry, whose natal day was the 17th of September, 1871, married Eva Gordon, a daughter of Harry and Mary Gordon, and is a resident of Victoria. Of this marriage there have been born five children, Gordon Wilder, Ralph Perry, Fred Richard, Helen Janet and Jean Almina. The Victoria cemetery, where so many members of the Clark family are buried, originally belonged to the farm now owned by our subject, but was deeded away, for the purpose it is now used, before he bought the place.
    In matters of faith Mr. Clark is a Methodist, as was also his wife, while his political views accord with the principles of the republican party. Although he has for many years had extensive business interests, that claimed the greater part of his attention, Mr. Clark never neglects his civic duties. He takes an active and helpful interest in the political affairs of the township, and served for twelve years as school trustee and director and for three terms as township supervisor. In the administration of his official duties he manifested the same sagacity and discretion as characterizes his transactions in business life, his service being marked by rare efficiency. Mr. Clark possesses not only unusual business acumen but great versatility, as anything that he has undertaken has been so capably directed, that it has proven a success from every point of view, and the methods used in its achievement have at all times been above question.
    He has the rare faculty of recognizing opportunities ignored by the man of less foresight, that he ably directs to his own advantage, and to this can be attributed his unusual success. In addition to his valuable realty holdings he is a stockholder and director of the State Bank of Victoria, and a stockholder of the Oneida State Bank of Oneida, and of the State Bank of Altona, while he is also a director and vice president of the latter institution. Through the entire period of his business career, Mr. Clark has at all times given evidence of possessing the qualities that would have won him recognition as a man of unusual mental powers and judicious discernment in any vocation he might have elected to follow. All of his transactions evidence the clear judgment, careful regard for details, keen discrimination and above all else the determination of purpose that characterize the successful man and give him the power wherewith he dominates conditions. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 386-391, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Frank Nelson Clark - Stockman, Orange Township, born July 15, 1864, at the Clark homestead, Orange Township, educated in Knox County. His parents are Luther and Sarah (Yeager) Clark, the former from New Jersey; his grandfather was Abraham Clark. Mr. Frank N. Clark was married in Knoxville February 7, 1889, to JENNIE R., daughter of John R. WILDER, of Knoxville. His father, Luther Clark, came from New Jersey to Knox County with his parents in 1843, and now owns a farm of two hundred and twenty acres. Frank N. was brought up on his father's farm, and became a practical farmer. When a boy ten years of age he was given charge of the swine which he bought, sold and improved according to his own good judgment which was remarkable. After clerking three winters in Knoxville, he returned to the farm, at the age of twenty-four, and became well known as the owner of the "Orange Herd" of Poland China hogs. This stock recorded; and one pig, Hadley's Model, No. 35913, is valued at $3,000. Mr. Clark is a republican and a member of the Modern Woodmen of America.(HISTORICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ILLINOIS AND KNOX COUNTY, Munsell Publishing Company, 1899, page 911, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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David Cation - Cashier, Williamsfield, Truro Township, born in Millbrook, Peoria County, June 16, 1856; educated in Elba Township, Knox County.  His parents, James Cation and Catherine (Gray), were born in Glasgow, Scotland; his paternal grandparents, William and Margaret (Paul) Cation, were born in Scotland.  He was married to ELLA BARBER February 20, 1884, in Quincy, Illinois.  She was born August 6, 1855.  There are two children living, James L., born January 18, 1885, near McMinnville, Oregon, and Catherine, born September 10, 1891.  Mr. Cation has been a teacher in the public schools of Knox, Peoria, and Stark counties, Illinois, and also in the state of Oregon.  He was in the employ of one of the largest lumbering firms in Portland, Oregon, for two years, and was weigher and clerk with the grain firm of J. W. Briedwell, at Briedwell, Oregon.   He was a student in Hedding College, Abingdon, Illinois, took a course in Brown's Business College, Jacksonville, Illinois, and graduated from the Normal Department of the Gem City Business College, Quincy, Illinois.  He has been Town Clerk and Supervisor of Cashier of the bank at Williamsfield.  In politics, he is a republican, and is at present a member of the Knox County Republican Committee.  (HISTORICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ILLINOIS AND KNOX COUNTY, Munsell Publishing Company, 1899, page 888, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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William Cation - Farmer; Truro Township; born August 29, 1858, in Peoria County; educated in Knox County.   His parents, James Cation and Catherine (Gray), were born in Glasgow, Scotland and his paternal grandparents were William and Margaret (Paul) Cation.  December 28, 1882, in Galesburg, Mr. Cation was married to SARAH A., daughter of Thomas A. and Olive COWELL; Mrs. Cation was born October 8, 1859.  There were four children: Lulu Maud, born March 22, 1885, died August 30, 1888; Charles Arthur, born August 2, 1889; Lelah May, born September 22, 1892; William James, born August 25, 1897.  Mrs. Cation's parents are now living in Elba Township.  Mr. Cation is a practical farmer and has a very fine home.  He is a republican.  (HISTORICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ILLINOIS AND KNOX COUNTY, Munsell Publishing Company, 1899, page 888, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Salina E. Clark - Haw Creek Township; born in Maquon Township, Knox County, Illinois, June 4, 1848, on the old Selby homestead.  Her parents were Philemon B. Selby of Lancaster, Ohio, and Elizabeth (Gullett) Selby.  Her first marriage was with Franklin THURMAN.  Two children were born to them, Mrs. Florence Odell, and Mrs. Mary Kromer. Her second marriage was with Thomas A. CLARK, son of Rev. William Clark of Knox County.  They have four children: Mrs. Jennie Burnside; William E.; Katie; Frederick.  Mr. Clark was Road Commissioner, and has been School Director for fifteen years.  He is a successful farmer.  (HISTORICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ILLINOIS AND KNOX COUNTY, Munsell Publishing Company, 1899, page 903, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Colonel Clark E. Carr - Galesburg is proud, as well it may be, of the record of Colonel Clark E. Carr, now one of the venerable and honored residence of the city. His interests and activities, however, have been so broad and varied as to make him a man of national character, for he has sustained many important relations to the public service and other associations has been found faultless in honor, fearless and conduct and stainless in reputation. He was born in the town of Boston, Erie County, New York, May 20,1836, and is descended from a family of English origin, the records of which are traced back to the time of the Norman Conquest. William Carr was born in London, in London, June 17,1597, and was married May 16, 1619 to Susan Rothchild, in London. They came to America in the fall of 1621 as passengers on the ship Fortune, Capt. Roger Williams commanding, and landed at Plymouth, Mass., on the seventh of November. For many generations the branch of the family of which Colonel car is a representative remained in New England. His paternal grandfather was the Rev. Clark Carr, who was born at East Greenwich, Rhode Island, where one of his ancestors, Caleb Carr, had once served as colonial governor. The Rev. Clark Carr was a Baptist minister who preached for 50 years in western New York, becoming a pioneer of that section of the state. He married Patty Merwin when and lived to be 80 years of age, while his wife reached the advanced age of almost 90 years. They were the parents of a son and two daughters: Clark M.; Laura, who became the wife of Ambrose Torrey; and Louisa who married Willard Alger.
     Clark M. Carr, born in the Empire State, was reared in Erie County, N.Y., and having arrived at years of maturity he wedded Delia Torrey, a native of Connecticut and a daughter of Asa and Lydia (Roberts) Torrey. Her father was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts and was of English descent. The mother of President Taft was a Torrey, closely related to Asa Torrey, Judge Alphonso Taft, the father of the president, having married Louisa Maria Torrey, a daughter of Samuel D. Torrey, of Millbury, Massachusetts.
     It was some years after the marriage of Clark M. Carr that he removed to the Middle West, arriving in the spring of 1850 in Henry County, Illinois, where he lived for nearly two years, after which he established his home in Galesburg in the autumn of 1851. Clark M. Carr engaged in various lines of business but his residence in Galesburg was largely occupied with the promotion and building of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. He died in the city in 1876 at the age of seventy-two years. His first wife, Mrs. Delia (Torrey) Carr, the mother of Colonel Carr, died in Erie County, New York, in 1839, when our subject was only three years of age, and in 1845 he married again, his second union being with Miss Fannie L Yaw. There were four children by the first marriage: General Eugene A. Carr, now deceased; Colonel Byron 0. Carr, living in Seattle, Washington; Rev. Dr. Horace M. Carr, of Parsons, Kansas; and Colonel Clark E. Carr, of this review. The children by the second marriage were George P., now deceased; and Grace, the wife of J. C. Fahnestock, of Galesburg. The second wife died in 1888.
     Colonel Clark E. Carr was but thirteen years of age when the family removed westward to Illinois and was a lad of 15 years when they left Henry County for Galesburg, where he has since made his home, having now resided in this city for six decades. He pursued his education in Knox Academy and Knox College, after which he returned to the east in preparation for a professional career and was graduated from the Albany, New York, Law School with the LL. B. degree. He has since been given the degree of Doctor of laws and for many years following his addition to the bar in 1857 he remained in practice in Galesburg. In fact he was an active representative of the bar here for nearly forty-five years but for the past ten years has lived retired. His work in the courts became a matter of record and indicated his comprehensive knowledge of the law and his ability to clearly, forcefully and cogently present the points of his case and the principles and precedents applicable thereto.
     As previously indicated Colonel Carr has been prominently known in many public connections and at all times his life has been one of great serviceableness in the fields in which he has labored. He won his military title by service during the Civil War on the staff of Illinois' distinguished war governor, Richard Yates. He was also postmaster of Galesburg for twenty-four years, been first appointed to the office in 1861 by Abraham Lincoln, of whom he was a personal friend.  In fact there are few men living in Illinois today who have had a wider acquaintance among the men of Illinois who have gained distinction and national honor and prominence. Colonel Carr has been a member of many commissions, becoming one of the original members of the Soldiers National Cemetery Association at Gettysburg, which established the cemetery there. He was present on the occasion when Abraham Lincoln inaugurated the cemetery and, seated near him on the stage, heard the President's matchless address, a full account of which Colonel Carr has given in his volume entitled "Lincoln at Gettysburg ". Presidential appointment under Benjamin Harrison made him minister plenipotentiary and envoy extraordinary to Denmark from 1889 until 1893. In politics he has always been a zealous Republican and of the great issues which divide the two parties, with their roots extending down to the very bedrock of the foundations of the Republic, he has a true statesman's grasp. Well grounded in the political maxims of the schools, he has also studied the lessons of actual life, of arriving at his conclusions as a result of what may be called his postgraduate studies in this school of affairs.
     On the 31st day of December, 1873, Colonel Carr was united in marriage to Ms. Grace Mills a daughter of Hon. Henry A. and Julia (Crosby) Mills, of Mount Carroll, Illinois. Mr. Mills, the father of Mrs. Carr, was the son of Abraham and Grace (DeBerard) Mills, the latter of French descent while the former was a native of New York, well known as a minister of the Presbyterian Church. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Carr was Stephen Crosby, who was born in Herkimer County, New York, and was a farmer and stock man. To Colonel and Mrs. Carr there were born to children: Clark Mills, who died in 1879 and for whom the Clark Mills Carr prize in Knox College is named; and Julia, who became the wife of Capt. W. P. Jackson, of the Third Infantry of the United States Army, who is now on duty at Zamboango, in the Philippine Islands. Capt. and Mrs. Jackson have one child, Margaret.
     Colonel Carr is the honored President of the Illinois State Historical Society and also of the Knox County Historical Association and few men are so thoroughly informed concerning the leading events which have shaped the history of the state. His comprehensive knowledge of all such has made the basis of his authorship of several most interesting volumes, including: The Illini, A Story of the Prairies; My Day and Generation; Lincoln at Gettysburg; The Postal Railway Service; and The of Life of Stephen A. Douglas. When an individual has advanced far on life's journey it is frequently said of him: "He is now living quietly at home, etc.", it is doubtful if this could ever be said of Colonel Carr. His has always been an active life and he still keeps in close connection with the events that marked the trend of the times and is thoroughly informed on the questions of significant and vital interest to city, state and nation. He is continuously giving out of the rich store of his wisdom and experience for the benefit of others and thus his life remains a serviceable factor in the world's work. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 5-7, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Albert J. Cline.  Albert J. Cline, of the Cline & Shaw Fuel Company, of Galesburg, was born in Peoria county, Illinois, October 16, 1871. He is a son of Peter S. and Miranda E. (Matteson) Cline, natives of the state of New York, the father having been born in Oswego county, in 1831, while the mother's birthplace was Troy. Peter S. Cline came west locating on a farm in Radner township, Peoria county. There he engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death in October, 1882. He was a democrat in his politics and served for eight years as a supervisor in his township. Five children were born of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Cline, of whom our subject is the fourth in order of birth. The others are as follow: Alice C, the wife of E. E. Kendall, of Victoria, Illinois; Fred C, who is deceased; Arthur R., who is residing in Galesburg; and Jessie C, the wife of Edwin Thommasson of Lefbridge, Alberta county. The family always attended the Presbyterian church in which the mother held membership.
     Reared on the farm where he was born Albert J. Cline first attended the common schools of Akron township, Peoria county. His education was later supplemented by study in the Chillicothe high school, and a course in Brown's Business College at Galesburg. Although he had early been trained in agricultural pursuits, when ready to select his life vocation he decided that he preferred a business career. His first position was in the office of I. R. Green, a well known coal dealer of Galesburg, by whom he was employed for a year. Later he became associated with R. N. Shaw in purchasing this business, which at that time only supplied the retail trade. Under their capable direction this enterprise flourished in a most gratifying manner and they later extended the scope of their activities by the addition of a wholesale department. Their offices are located in the Holmes building, suite 201 to 205, this city. They do a wholesale coal business and also handle sand, gravel and crushed rock. The business has increased in a most satisfactory manner and they now have a well established and constantly increasing patronage. They are incorporated for fifteen thousand dollars with Mr. Cline as president; A. R. Cline, vice president; and R. N. Shaw, secretary and treasurer.
     On the 31st of October, 1900, Mr. Cline was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Brown, a daughter of James A. and Ellen (Spence) Brown, of Good Hope, Illinois. They were both natives of Pennsylvania, the father having been born in the vicinity of Pittsburg, and the mother at Sunbury. In the early years of their domestic life they came to Illinois, locating on a farm at Good Hope, to the further improvement of which the father devoted his energies until his death. The mother is still living and now makes her home at Macomb, Illinois. In religious faith Mr. Brown was a Presbyterian, and his widow still holds membership in that church. The birth of Mrs. Cline occurred on the old family homestead at Good Hope, on the 3d of September, 1877, and there she was reared to womanhood. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cline, Margaret A., whose birth occurred in Galesburg, on September 25, 1905. Fraternally Mr. Cline is an Odd Fellow and both he and Mrs. Cline belong to the Presbyterian church, and politically he is a republican. He has never sought political honors, however, always preferring to give his undivided attention to the further development of his business.  (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 85-86, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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John Z. Carns.  John Z. Carns, who for the past eleven years has been president of the Farmers' National Bank of Knoxville, has spent the entire period of his business career in this institution, where he was first employed in the capacity of assistant cashier. His birth occurred in Knoxville on September 8, 1858, and he is the only child born of the marriage of John W. and Sarah (Zook) Carns. The father was born in Staunton, Augusta county, Virginia, on the 22d of May, 1808, and there he lived until he was eight years of age. Jacksonville, Illinois, became his home in 1816, and there he completed his schooling and learned the tailor's trade, which he followed for some years. In 1836 he left Jacksonville and came to Knoxville where he became associated with John Eads in establishing a grocery and dry-goods store. This undertaking proved to be very successful and they later extended the scope of their activities by opening a clothing store. Their efforts met with increasing prosperity and Mr. Carns became one of the substantial citizens of the town. He was a man of unusual energy and ambition and continued to be identified with the commercial activities of Knoxville until 1879, when he retired. Mr. Carns was twice married, his first union having been with Miss Eleanor York, to whom he was united on October 8, 1834. She was born in Kentucky on the 28th of July, 1817, and passed away in Knoxville, on August 8, 1851. Unto them were born three children, two of whom are still living: Mary, the wife of John Brewer, of Monmouth; and Sarah Elizabeth, the widow of O. N. Barnhart, also of Monmouth. On the 7th of September, 1857, Mr. Carns was married to Miss Sarah Zook, who was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, on the 6th of March, 1819.
     After the completion of his preliminary education John Z. Carns entered Knox College, at Galesburg. At the age of twenty-seven years, in 1885, he began his business career, and entered the bank, with which he has ever since been identified, in the capacity of assistant cashier. He attentively applied himself to the thorough mastery of his various duties, at the same time acquiring a broader knowledge of finance, thus qualifying himself for the responsibilities of a higher position. In 1887 he was promoted to the office of cashier in which he continued until 1899 when he was elected president. During the long period of his connection with the banking interests of Knox county, Mr. Carns has proven himself to be unusually well qualified for the position he now holds. His clear judgment, foresight and conservative policy well adapt him for the head of a financial institution, and the Farmers' National Bank of Knoxville is one of the strongest and best established banks of the county.
     In Knoxville on September 10, 1890, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Carns and Miss Nellie Pierce. She is a daughter of Charles A. and Ellen P. Pierce. The father, who was a native of the state of New York, is now deceased, but the mother is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Carns there has been born one daughter, Marie, whose birth occurred on October 26, 1892.
     His political allegiance Mr. Carns gives to the republican party and the past twenty-five years he has been a member of the local school board, and he has also served in the capacity of city treasurer. He is one of the more progressive citizens of the town, and is always ready to give his cooperation or endorsement to any movement that is inaugurated for the purpose of promoting the community welfare, along all lines of general interest.  (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 95-96, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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George M. Clark, chief clerk of the election commissioners for the city of Galesburg and at one time treasurer of Knox county, was born in Orange township, this county, on the 24th of April, 1872. The ancestral history declares the family to be of German origin although representatives of the name have long been residents of America. Abraham Clark, the grandfather of George M. Clark, came from the state of New York and was a farmer by occupation. He married Anna Wise and at length removed westward, becoming one of the early farmers of this county. The land which he purchased he converted into rich and productive fields and he continued his residence upon the old homestead until his death, which occurred in Orange township when he had passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten. His wife reached the very remarkable old age of ninety-four years. Their family numbered three children, Nelson, Luther and Elizabeth, the last named becoming the wife of Cornelius King.
     Luther Clark, the father of George M. Clark, was born in Tioga county, New York, July 1, 1829, and was fourteen years of age when the family came to Knox county, Illinois, in 1843, so that he attained his majority while living upon the old homestead in Orange township. He shared with the family in the hardships and experiences of pioneer life, early becoming familiar with the work of the fields from the time of early spring planting until after the crops were harvested in the late autumn. When he had attained man's estate he began farming on his own account, purchasing eighty acres of land. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made upon the property when it came into his possession but with characteristic energy he began to break the sod and till the fields and in due time his land returned to him abundant crops. As he prospered in his undertaking he extended the boundaries of his property until at one time he owned two hundred acres. On the 3d of February, 1859, he married Sarah Yeager, who was born in Miami county, Ohio, April 5, 1839, and traced her ancestry back to Germany. To them were born six children: Anna E., the wife of Arthur S. Randall, of Orange township; Curtis A., and Frank N., both residents of Orange township; John A., of Galesburg; George M., of this review; and Mary, who married J. W. Wise, of Knoxville. The death of the father occurred February 3, 1900, and the mother passed away May 25, 1903. She was a devoted member of the Congregational church and her kindly spirit and many good traits of character won her the love of all who knew her. In politics Mr. Clark was a republican and served in several local offices, acting as township assessor and also as supervisor for a number of years.
     George M. Clark spent his youthful days on his father's farm in Orange township, dividing his time between the work of the fields and the acquirement of an education in the district schools up to the time when he entered the Galesburg Business College. After completing his course in that institution he then returned to the farm and carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1907. He inherited a part of the old homestead and bought out the interests of the other heirs in that property, still owning the farm which comprises one hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land. A noted educator who has given much study to the sources of the country's wealth says that there is no better investment in all America than Illinois farm land and in his property Mr. Clark has a source of gratifying income. He left the farm and removed to Galesburg to assume the duties of county treasurer, having been appointed to the office in January, 1909, after which he was chosen for the position at a special election in June of that year. He served for about two years, filling out an unexpired term of O. N. Custer. He had formerly filled the office of supervisor for seven years and was township collector for three years. He has ever discharged his official duties with promptness and fidelity and the record he has made in this connection is a most creditable one. In his political views he has ever been a republican and for one term served as chairman of the republican county central committee. He was likewise chairman of the board of supervisors for two terms, and resigned to enter upon the duties of the office of county treasurer.
     The marriage of George M. Clark and Miss Elizabeth Krise was celebrated October 22, 1894. She was a daughter of George A. and Mary A. (Sheets) Krise, and by her marriage she became the mother of three children, Clare, Frances and Dorothy. Death called her March 18, 1900, and the family lost a devoted mother and the Congregational church a faithful member. Mr. Clark was married again, December 21, 1905, his second union being with Miss Susie D. Hartnell, who was born in England, of which country her parents, George and Mary (Dean) Hartnell, were also natives. They came to this country during the early girlhood of their daughter Susie. They now reside in Orange township, where Mr. Hartnell is yet following the occupation of farming. The children of the family are: Mary; Albert; Ethel and Edith, twins; John; Joseph; Susie; and a half-brother, William Aplin. Mr. and Mrs. Clark became parents of two children, Helen and Ruth Margaret, but the first born, Helen, died in infancy.
     Mr. Clark belongs to the Modern Woodmen Camp of De Long, also the local lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is supreme treasurer of the Fraternal Reserve Life Association of Peoria. Wherever known he is held in high esteem and most of all where he is best known. His life has been quietly passed and yet he has at all times been a faithful citizen and a reliable business man who is trustworthy in his friendships and true to every trust reposed in him. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 137-139, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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George Boardman Churchill. The steps in the orderly progression of George Boardman Churchill are, easily discernible. He has gradually worked his way upward until he is now at the head of the Churchill Hardware Company, one of the largest commercial enterprises of Galesburg. He is also recognized as a man of marked public spirit, whose interest in the general welfare has never been a perfunctory one. His active and helpful cooperation in public movements has been the manifestation of a deep interest in all that pertains to the progress, upbuilding and prosperity of the community and his work of a public nature has always been fruitful of substantial results.
     Galesburg numbers him among her native sons, his birth having here occurred August 16, 1865. He represents one of the oldest families of the city. His paternal grandfather was Norman Churchill, a native of New York, who served as a soldier in the war of 1812, while his father was one of the heroes of the Revolutionary war. Norman Churchill became a pioneer of Galesburg and is said to have made the first trade consummated here. He took a very active and helpful part in the development and progress of this section of the state and was also connected with many interests and projects of a public nature outside of the field of business. He became one of the conductors on the famous underground railroad, for his anti-slavery views prompted him to assist many a negro on his way to freedom in the north. Both he and his wife remained residents of Galesburg until called to their final rest. Their children were: Wilberforce, who was killed while serving in the Civil war; Emily; Belle; Elvira; Norman; Julia; and George.
     The last named was the father of George Boardman Churchill, and was a native of New York. He was brought to Galesburg in 1839, when but ten years of age, was here reared to manhood and devoted his entire life to the profession of teaching. For forty-seven years he was one of the professors in Knox College and his labors did much to place that institution in the high and honored position which it has always held as one of the educational centers of the state. He was also the founder of the public-school system of Galesburg and for many years served on the board of education, his labors constituting a practical and forceful element in the establishment of the schools and their conduct along lines, rendering them of practical worth to the young as a preparation for life's work. Professor Churchill also served for many years on the library board, was city engineer for thirty years and was one of the first surveyors of the Military Tract Railroad, which became a part of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy system. He long filled the position of alderman and exercised his official prerogatives in support of every plan and project for the general good. His entire life was actuated by the high and honorable principles which have their root in Christian faith and he was long a devoted member of the Central Congregational church, serving as superintendent of its Sunday school for a quarter of a century. He was twice married, his first wife being Clara Hurd, a relative of the Gale family, who were the founders of Galesburg. They had one son, Milton E. Churchill. After losing his first wife Professor Churchill wedded Ada Hayes, a native of Vermont. She was a second cousin of ex-President Hayes, while Professor Churchill was a second cousin of Samuel J. Tilden, the two men who were rival candidates for the presidency in 1876. Mrs. Churchill was a daughter of the Rev. Gordon Hayes, whose father was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Gordon Hayes was a native of Vermont and a minister of the Congregational church. He married a Miss Fassett and on removing westward settled in Muscatine, Iowa, where both he and his wife passed away, his death occurring when he was more than ninety years of age, while his wife died at the age of eighty-nine. They had a large family: Mary, a missionary to China, who was the wife of William Jones, an editor of the Old Curiosity Shop, a department of the Chicago Inter-Ocean; Lilly, the wife of Walter Waugh; Ed.; Charles; Daniel; John; and Ada. It was the last named who became the wife of Professor Churchill, and unto them were born three children: Charles Edward, now living in Montclair, New Jersey; George Boardman; and Mary, who was accidentally shot when three years old. The mother also met her death by accident in April, 1869, after which Professor Churchill married Ellen Sanborn Watkins. He died in Galesburg in 1899, at the age of seventy years, the city thereby losing one of its most honored and representative residents—a man whose worth to the community as a factor in its intellectual progress and its stability and prosperity cannot be overestimated.
     George B. Churchill has been a lifelong resident of Knox county, spending the entire period in Galesburg save for three years, during which he resided in Abingdon. He was a pupil in the public schools and in Knox College and following the completion of his education engaged in clerking for five months in the hardware store of Main, Foltz & Givens. This sufficed to convince him that it was a congenial occupation and he then entered into partnership with W. B. Main, spending two and a half years in that relation in Abingdon. This terminated the three years' period of his absence from Galesburg, after which he returned to his native city and purchased the hardware store of O. T. Duvon, admitting his brother-in-law H. F. Wetherbee to a partnership under the firm style of Churchill & Wetherbee. This connection was continued until 1894, when he purchased his partner's interest and conducted the business under the name of the G. B. Churchill Company. For the past eleven years it has been carried on under the style of the Churchill Hardware Company and is one of the most extensive mercantile enterprises of the city, a large stock of goods finding ready sale because of the excellent line which he carries and his thorough reliability in all business transactions. In addition to his hardware enterprise Mr. Churchill has been closely associated with many business interests and activities of a semi-public character, which have proved potent forces in the city's growth and development. He was instrumental in securing the building of the switch between the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and the Santa Fe Railroads. He was also chairman for many years of the new enterprise committee of the Commercial Club, which instituted organized efforts for the public good. He is likewise president of the Galesburg Union Telephone Company, which is the largest independent telephone plant outside of Chicago in the state, and for many years he was a director of the Coulter-Disc Manufacturing Company, his labors being largely responsible for the location of this plant in Galesburg. He was likewise one of the original ten men who built the street car line from Galesburg to Abingdon and thus his work at all times has been a feature in the business development and public improvement of the city. Mr. Churchill was a member of the committee on city buildings and as such instrumental in erecting the fire department building, the city hall, the jail and patrol station, and also served on the committee that bought the city park.
     Mr. Churchill was married, January 17, 1894, to Miss Matie O'Connor, a daughter of James and Mary (Ryan) O'Connor, but she died in the fall of the same year. On the 12th of February, 1896, he wedded Clara Scott Babcock, who was born in Detroit, Michigan, a daughter of Charles M. and Maggie (McChesney) Babcock. Her father was a native of New York, while her mother was one of the first children born in Galesburg. She is now living in Los Angeles, California, but Mr. Babcock passed away in this city when about sixty-five years of age. In their family were four children, O. Frank, George M., Mabel E., and Clara. Mr. Babcock's father was a native of Oneida county, New York, and his mother belonged to the Sherman family. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Churchill was an early settler of Galesburg and married a Miss Scott. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Churchill have been born three children, Lake George, Marjorie J., and William. The family residence is at No. 1042 North Cedar street and the members of the household are prominent in the social circles of the city. Mr. Churchill belongs to Veritas Lodge, No. 478, I. O. O. F., and to the Galesburg Club, of which he was one of the founders. Any project or movement which has its root in a desire to prove of public benefit receives his indorsement and co­operation, for he is widely known as a public-spirited citizen, whose work has been a resultant factor for good. His business interests and connections have largely been of a character that has contributed to general progress and prosperity and his labors have been a most potent factor in stimulating trade relations. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 189-192, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Ira S. Callender. Ira S. Callender, president of the Glenwood Ice & Coal Company and thus prominent in the business circles of the city as head of one of the important industrial projects here, was born in Peoria. Illinois, July 31. 1857, a son of Isaac and Sarah A. (Smith) Callender. His father was born in Henry county, Kentucky, September 10, 1833, and for many years followed farming in Illinois but at length retired from active life and removed to Galesburg, where he passed away September 10, 1907. He always voted with the republican party and filled the office of county supervisor, the duties of which he discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. He held membership in the Central Congregational church, to which his widow still belongs. She was born April 13, 1833, and yet makes her home in Galesburg. In their family were eight children: Ira S., of this review; James J., who is a resident of Tulsa, Oklahoma; Albert B., living at Matehuala, Mexico; William H., of Galesburg; Adella, the wife of Dr. T. F. Clark, of Kansas City, Missouri; Lilly Belle and Frank Edwin, both residing in Galesburg, Illinois ; and Mary Catherine, who is the wife of A. E. Wells, of Galesburg.
     Ira S. Callender, whose name introduces this record, pursued his education in the public schools of Geneseo, Illinois, and remained upon his father's farm until twenty-one years of age. He made good progress in his studies and when a young man began teaching school, which profession he successfully followed for a time, displaying ability in imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge which he had acquired. In 1880 he went to Nebraska, where he divided his time between general agricultural pursuits and teaching school for three years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Galesburg in December, 1883, and purchased an interest in the ice business with which he has since been connected. The business was established in 1885 under the name of the Glenwood Ice Company handling ice only, when in 1891 the scope of the business was extended to include the sale of coal as well. In 1907 the present firm style of the Glenwood Ice & Coal Company was assumed and the business was reincorporated. The officers in 1892 were: John Robson, president; A. D. Shults, treasurer; and Ira S. Callender, secretary. At the present writing Mr. Callender is president, A. E. Wells, secretary and C. S. Burnside, treasurer. The business is incorporated with a capital of one hundred thousand dollars and the company owns well equipped ice houses on the lakes east of Galesburg and at New Boston and Moline, Illinois. The coal trade is also an important branch of the business, coal being sold at retail. The enterprise has had a continuous, steady and gratifying growth, as is indicated by the fact that in the first year of its existence its sales amounted to twenty-five hundred tons of ice, while at the present writing the sales have reached fifty thousand tons of ice annually. In the first year but two wagons were used in delivery, while in the present year eleven wagons were used and forty men are employed outside of the office in Knox county, ten of the number being at New Boston. A large part of the ice harvested is furnished to dealers in other towns surrounding Galesburg, and to the Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. The company also handles wood, kindling and oil, and the business is a most gratifying and profitable one. Its success is undoubtedly due in large measure to the honorable, straightforward business policy that is ever followed as well as to the progressive methods instituted by the president and his associate officers.
     On the 2d of February, 1882, Mr. Callender was united in marriage to Miss Alice Bassford, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Antoinette (Lane) Bassford, of Brooklyn, New York. Their children are: Ira I., now deceased; Wallace V., who is living in Pasadena, California; Alice B., who is the wife of Archer Laurence, of Plainfield, New Jersey; Ida E., the wife of Hans John Von Hangen, of Matehuala, Mexico; Gladys M. and Ruth S., both at home.
     While Mr. Callender has never been an active party worker, he does not fail to make his way to the polls and cast a ballot in support of the principles of the republican party, for he regards this as the duty as well as the privilege of every American citizen. He is prominent in the Elks lodge of Galesburg and is serving as one of its trustees but his position is preeminently that of an active, enterprising business man who is ever alert and determined and who brooks no obstacles in the path to success that can be overcome by persistent effort and indefatigable energy. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 217-218, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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Reverend Thomas Camp, third son and seventh child of Sterling and Anna Camp, was born in McMinn County, Tennessee, January 21, 1814 and died at Abingdon, this county, November 26, 1856. His parents were born in South Carolina and in their youth witnessed the stirring and often distressing scenes that occurred in that section during the Revolutionary War.
     In early life, they accompanied the first emigrants who crossed the mountains and sought settlement in East Tennessee, amid the wilds of nature and the still wilder Indians, and there shared the hardships and perils encountered by the early settlers of that region. Pushing on in the van of emigration, they at length acquired a body of valuable land, then in the territory of the Cherokees, now embraced in McMinn County, where they made final settlement. There their children were born and reared, and there their ashes now rest. Shut in by formidable mountain ranges, communication with the outer world was both difficult and rare. Few books, fewer letters, and still fewer newspapers reached these land-locked pioneers. Business, moral, social and religious standards took quality largely from individuals who, by common consent, gave laws on these questions, by the power of their opinions and example.
     Among those uncrowned, non-elected givers of laws, to their fellows, were Sterling and Anna Camp - he, in the morals, methods and habits of successful business - she, in the domestic, social and religious virtues. Such was the parentage of the subject of this sketch, and such the conditions to which he was born, and which, with small modifications, surrounded him to the age of manhood. He had small opportunity for obtaining an education, other than he found or could make within his own home. However, a native thirst for knowledge led him to employ all his available time to study, and while still young he evinced a strong desire for a liberal education, which grew to be the one ambition of his earlier years.     Circumstances compelled him to abandon this cherished purpose, which through all subsequent life was a source of deepest regret. At the town of White Plains, Alabama, December 20, 1835, he was married to Charity Teague, fourth daughter of Dr. John Neal, a physician then widely known through the new Southern states. Returning with his bride, he was soon established in a home on land situate on the Hiawassee River, one and a quarter miles above Charleston. This land was put under cultivation, and large grain and saw mills, workshops, etc. were erected at the riverside. Here was his home and the principal scene of his labors, till the autumn of 1848, when in company with his brother-in-law, Reverend John M. Courtney, and two other families, he emigrated to Western Illinois - proceeding the entire distance by road wagons - reaching his temporary destination in Warren county, after six weeks' traveling. In the spring of 1849 he purchased and located upon a tract of land, situated where the town of Good Hope, McDonough County, now stands, a point then separated by many miles in some directions from the nearest settler. This property he improved, and upon it resided with his family till the spring of 1856, when he removed to Abingdon, which has been the home of a portion of his family during the past 30 years. His sole purpose in this removal was to give his children such opportunity for an education as he had so ardently desired for himself, but which had been denied him. Thomas Camp was the son of a Puritan mother, and partook largely of her physical and mental characteristics.
     Mrs. Anna Camp, nee Helm, was tall, lithe and sinewy, of body - clear, vigorous and courageous of mind, with moral and religious convictions as well defined as a geometric figure. She possessed much of that force of character which has made several of her name conspicuous figures in different Southern communities. Though of purely Carolina stock, she was as essentially Puritan in heroic endurance for, and in defense of truth, right, liberty and conscience as any who ever went out from Plymouth Colony. These qualities contributed much to make her the authority and power she was among the people and amid the perils of her border home. Among the things that came to be approved by people of influence about her, which fell under condemnation by her fixed standards, were rum and slavery - to both of which she was unalterably opposed. In these views of the mother the son shared from boyhood, with all the intensity of a strong nature. He felt the wrong of slavery as strongly as did any New England Abolitionist, and in addition thereto he knew, by actual contact with that institution, its blighting influence upon the better nature of both the white and black races, and early determined to place his children beyond its immediate contagion. It was to effect this object that he sacrificed his comfortable home in the South and accepted the stern conditions of an early settler in Illinois - a step he never regretted. When, after a painful struggle, he abandoned his cherished purpose of suitably preparing for a learned profession, he turned to his plantation, mills, and shops, with much energy, perseverance and fair success; at the same time prosecuting such course of reading and study as his limited leisure would permit. This line of life, however, did not prove satisfying. He was possessed by an uncontrollable impulse toward a sphere of broader usefullness among men. At length he became convinced that it was his duty to enter the Gospel ministry, and to allot a portion of his time to that work, while the remainder should be employed in conducting his ordinary business affairs. Very many of the most effective preachers of that country and period so divided their time. Accordingly, on the 18th of May, 1845, he was ordained to the ministry of the Baptist church, and from that date to the close of his life, a portion of his time was set apart for that work, and with such allotment he allowed no requirement of other business to interfere. He never accepted the pastorate of any church, though repeatedly urged to do so - choosing rather to labor in the unoccupied or irreligious fields. He never accepted compensation for ministerial labor, but always gave liberally of his own private means to the support of the Gospel, and insisted that Christians to whom he preached should do likewise.
     Mr. Camp had little of the mannerism and minor methods of popular preachers, and was therefore not a universal favorite. However, among more thoughtful people, of various shades of belief and unbelief, his ministry was ever acceptable, commanding their attendance and profound attention. In his pulpit service he attempted no mere verbal ornamentation or rhetorical effect. His discourses - clear, logical and practical, enforced by scriptural quotations, and illustrated by facts gleaned from a wide range of reading - were directed to the minds and consciences of men with great power. He held that, under our form of government, the duties of citizenship take rank as high moral and religious obligations and therefore, took deep interest in the politics of his country. He was a stanch Whig until that party was disbanded, when he naturally affiliated with the Republican party with zeal and enthusiasm. It is remembered that he felled with his own hands, and with his teams conveyed to the spot on Main street, Abingdon, where it was erected, the young tree out of which was wrought the great pole from which the large Fremont and Dayton flag floated during the campaign of 1856. He felt the defeat of the Republican party in that year, with all the poignancy of a personal bereavement. The principles for which he had contended for a lifetime achieved a political triumph four years later, but ere then he had been "gathered to his fathers."
He placed an exaggerated estimate upon the advantages conferred by a classical education, and though a man of rare attainment, he always felt at a disadvantage among men whose opportunities for education had been such as had been denied to him. This, added to a native modesty approaching diffidence, caused him to shrink from prominence among his fellows, and resulted frequently in his not being placed in those stations of responsibility for which he was so eminently fitted by superior natural and acquired abilities.
     A devoted husband and father, consistent in character, a model of probity, ardent and tenacious in friendship, wise and sympathetic in counsel, generous to a fault, and a lover of his kind, Thomas Camp was, altogether, such a manly man as goodmen, everywhere, cherish in association and in memory.
     Charity Teague Camp, relict of Reverend Thomas Camp, resided at Abingdon for more than a fourth of a century. She was born in South Carolina, May 7, 1818, and died at Shenendoah, Iowa, September 26, 1885. She was the fourth daughter of Dr. John and Rebecca B. Neal, scions of an old South Carolina family. Dr. Neal was a man of great skill as a physician, but of such restless energy that no single vocation satisfied him. To his professional labors, he, from time to time, added those of merchant, planter, drover, mill-owner, etc., but not with uniform success. He made and lost fortunes with marvelous rapidity and equanimity. The excitement of frontier enterprises and dangers had a peculiar fascination for him, and in 1834, led him to locate among the Creek Indians, in Alabama, where he died a few years later. He was a man of spotless character, and of broad usefullness in his time.
     The subject of this sketch had few advantages derived from schools of any grade, being reared in the same vicinity and amid surroundings similar to those of her husband. But, in addition to the intellectual character and pursuits of her father, she had large compensation in her mother, who had been bred with great care and tenderness, and who devoted herself with rare assiduity and success to the culture of the minds and manners of her daughters. Mrs. Camp sympathized heartily with the tastes and pursuits of her husband, and by her cheerful, hopeful views of life, shed continuous sunshine upon their often rugged and shadowy pathway. She was womanly in the last degree by nature, and instinctively leaned upon her husband in all purely business affairs - a habit strengthened by her her Southern education. When, therefore, she was left a widow, with a limited income and eight children, all minors, she felt, as she expressed it "like a child confronted by a stone wall, through which it must pass." She, however, bravely consecrated the energies of her life to carrying forward the work begun by her husband, in the education of their children and never turned aside from it while opportunity lasted. How she struggled and sacrificed, in that war, many know in part, and her children will cherish in holy remembrance.
     In the summer of 1861, her married daughter emigrated across the plains to California, and her eldest son entered the service of his government in a foreign land. In the autumn of the same year, her other sons, aged 20 and 17 respectively enlisted in the Union Army, for a term of three years' service.
     About the same time, death claimed little Lizzie, the idol of the household, leaving only the widow and three young daughters in the broken home. What she endured in her loneliness, from domestic cares, anxiety for absent ones - more specifically the awful suspense that hung about the results to her of oft-recurring battles in the field, during the terrible years of the Civil War - no mortal ever knew, for she bore her great burdens in secret.
     She was devoutly pious from early youth, and her faith gave tone and strength to her character. Trusting implicitly in the promises of God of the Bible, she rested in the arms of Omnipotence with a quiet courage which no calamity could wholly break. her religion was, to her, a fountain of hope and cheerfulness, even in the darkest days of her long widowhood, and kept her heart young to the end of life. She was ever the ideal of children, the welcome companion of youth, the cherished friend and counselor of young manhood and womanhood. She was a wife and mother in all those sacred terms imply, and lived a widow nearly 30 years, not in name only, but in heart. In every relation in life, she filled the full measure of a true woman - loved while living and mourned when dead, by a wide circle of friends. She lived to see her seven remaining children heads of families, and to rejoice in the love and veneration of her grandchildren. Her four daughters are women of high character and liberal culture, ranking with the useful members of the community in which they live. Mrs. Rebecca A. Nye lives at San Jose, California; Sarah E., wife of Dr. S. M. Spaulding, lives at Minneapolis, Minnesota; Maggie M., wife of Dr. H.F. Duffield, lives at Shenandoah, Iowa; Ivy C., wife of M. J. Duffield, lives at Omaha, Nebraska.
     John N., the eldest son, who was educated at Abingdon College, was appointed at the beginning of President Lincoln's administration Consul to Kingston, Jamaica. After the expiration of his term, he was engaged for awhile in business in Central America. From that country he went to Galveston, Texas, where he has since made his home, and subsequently he was appointed by President Grant Collector of Internal Revenue for the First District of Texas. He became active and prominent in the latter part of the reconstruction of Texas, being a member of most of the conventions of his party (Republican) and a wise counselor in all its deliberations, as the writer of this sketch personally knows. In Galveston, especially, has he been the leader of his party, and directed here all its movements. He is a man of fine personal appearance, of large intellect, extensive culture, of exalted character and unquestionable integrity.
     Sterling T. and Henry Clary served over three years in the Union Army, participating in many battles, among them Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Pleasant Hill, and the two days' fight near Nashville. They were in the 58th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Lynch. S.T. resides at Abingdon; H. C. in St. Paul, Minnesota. (Portrait & Biographical Album of Knox County, Illinois, pub. in 1886, pages 926 & 930, submitted by Pat Thomas)

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Charles H. Chamberlain. Charles H. Chamberlain is a prominent factor in industrial circles as treasurer of the Purington Paving Brick Company, one of the most important productive enterprises of Galesburg and the most extensive establishment of its kind in the United States. His birth occurred in Pratts Hollow, Aladison county,New York, on the I2th of September, 1851, his parents being Orason and Lucinda C. (Lewis) Chamberlain. The father was born at that place on the 2ist of February, 1819, while the mother's birth occurred in Morrisville, Madison county, New York, on the I5th of May, 1823. Orason Chamberlain, who was one of the proprietors of a woolen mill at Pratts Hollow, New York, removed to Dubuque, Iowa, in 1858 and was there engaged in the commission business throughout the remainder of his life, his demise occurring on the 5th of August, 1865. He gave his political allegiance to the republican party and was a valued member of the Universalist church, acting as one of its trustees.
    It was at Morrisville, New York, that he wedded Miss Lucinda C. Lewis, who still survives him and makes her home with our subject. They became the parents of three children, as follows: Annette and Dwight L., both of whom are deceased; and Charles H., of this review. The last named obtained his early education in the schools of Dubuque, Iowa, and later continued his studies in the high school at Englewood, Illinois.
    After putting aside his text-books he entered the First National Bank of Chicago as a messenger boy, winning gradual promotion as he demonstrated his worth and ability until he was given charge of the country books. In 1886 he left that institution and went to Kansas for the benefit of his health, riding the range for six years. On the expiration of that period, in 1892, he came to Galesburg, Illinois, as secretary of the Purington Paving Brick Company, which position he held for some time. He is now serving as treasurer of this important concern and his efforts have contributed in no small degree to its continued growth and success. He is likewise a stockholder in the Farmers & Mechanics Bank and has long held a leading place among the representative business men and citizens of Galesburg.
    On the 11th of May, 1876, Mr. Chamberlain was united in marriage to Miss Helena Gorton, a daughter of Truman and Elizabeth (Searle) Gorton, of Rock Island, Illinois. Unto them were born three children, as follows: Lewis Gorton, who is deceased; Ethel, the wife of Gail Porter, of East Orange, New Jersey; and Ruth Helen, at home.
    Mr. Chamberlain gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has served as alderman of the third ward for four years. His religious faith is that of the Universalist church and his official position therein is that of chairman of the board of trustees. He also belongs to Englewood Council of the National Union and is a valued member of the Galesburg Club. Mr. Chamberlain is a thoroughgoing business man, improving his opportunities for the attainment of financial success, and his diligence has been the source of his prosperity. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 393-394, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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George Churchill. An enumeration of the residents of Galesburg who have won honor and distinction and at the same time whose records have been an honor to the city, would be incomplete and unsatisfactory were there failure to make prominent reference to George Churchill. His work in behalf of public education would alone entitle him to distinction and yet in other relations of life his labors were equally commendable and were crowned with far-reaching and beneficial effects. Progress and patriotism might well be termed the keynote of his character, prompting his active cooperation in every movement for the public good and his loyal support of the salient features of good citizenship.
     Dr. Churchill was born in Herkimer county, New York, April 2, 1829, a son of Norman and Ann (Eggleston) Churchill. The father first visited Illinois early in the fall of 1836, at which time he purchased ten acres of land on West Main street in Galesburg which is still known as the Churchill home. To this he removed in 1839 and remained thereafter an active and honored resident of this city where he passed away on the 20th of September, 1886, at the age of eighty-seven years. He was born in Hubbardton, Vermont, November 5, 1799, the son of the Rev. Jesse Churchill.
     George Churchill was a lad of only ten years when the family home was established in Galesburg and from that time until his death he was an interested witness of the changes which here occurred and the growth that wrought the present prosperity of the city. He entered Knox College as a student in the preparatory department in the first year of its history and when other preparations had qualified him for advanced study, he entered the college class and was graduated in 1851. He then crossed the threshold of the business world, spending a year as civil engineer in connection with the construction of the Central Military Tract Railroad, which later became a part of the main line of the Burlington. However, his interest in the cause of education had been aroused and he was giving much time and thought to the study of the public-school system. He recognized the fact that the schools in Galesburg and vicinity were inadequate to the needs of a community that was growing rapidly and he desired to supplant that system by an improved one. This desire took him to Europe in order that he might make a most thorough inspection of the schools of Prussia. He carried with him letters from the United States secretary of state which enabled him to gain an accurate knowledge of the system of instruction of the country which he visited. He gained many valuable ideas which his practical ability enabled him to adapt to the needs of the Galesburg schools and upon returning to this city he at once undertook the task of arousing public sentiment in favor of an improved school system. He not only gave generously of his time and energies but his work also made large inroads upon the small salary that he received as a teacher. He did not hesitate, however, in the accomplishment of his purpose and called to his assistance the Hon. Henry Barnard, of Connecticut, who afterward received the first appointment as commissioner of education for the United States. His determined perseverance finally resulted in procuring a special charter by which the former district schools were consolidated and the foundation of the present system was laid. The board of education has shown a just appreciation of Dr. Churchill's services by naming one of the grammar schools in his honor and by adopting, on the 14th of January, 1896, special resolutions commending him for his work. He may well be termed the father of the public-school system of Galesburg, for it received its impetus toward improvement from his untiring labors and practical, far-reaching methods. For thirteen years he was a member of the board of education and labored untiringly to arouse the standard of the schools.
     This by no means comprised the extent of Dr. Churchill's public service or indicates the limit of his usefulness. For twenty-two years he served as city engineer and in other public offices labored for the welfare and upbuilding of the city. For two terms he was alderman, for eight years was a member of the board of park commissioners and for twenty-three years or until the time of his death held a position on the library board. For forty-four years he was one of the professors of Knox College, and that institution, ever regarded as one of the strong and stable educational forces of the state, owes to him a debt of gratitude which can never be paid. Far beyond any pecuniary recompense that could be made him were his labors in behalf of the college. He never lowered the high standard which he set up but sought ever to work toward it and his own enthusiasm and zeal constituted an inspiration to fellow teachers and pupils. Of him it was written: "He was born to be useful; he was born to be good; he was born especially as an educator of the youth." While he always strove to attain high ideals his methods were ever practical and he proved his worth and force in business circles as well as along professional lines. He became one of the directors and the just president of the Mechanics Homestead & Loan Association, occupying this position from its organization in 1882. Its assets and disbursements in 1899 amounted to two and a half million dollars.
     Dr. Churchill was married three times. He first wedded Clara A. Hurd and to them was born a son, Milton E., who is now professor of Pomona College at Claremont, California. His second wife was Ada H. Hayes and they had one daughter and two sons: Mary H., now deceased; Charles E., an attorney of Montclair, New Jersey; and George B., of Galesburg. For his third wife Dr. Churchill chose Ellen Sanborn Watkins, who died five years ago, and they had one son, William David. By a former marriage Mrs. Churchill also had a daughter, Mrs. Nellie Sanborn (Watkins) Wetherbee. It was in 1851 that Mrs. Churchill came with her parents from Bronfield, Illinois, to Knox county. Previously they had been residents of Vermont. Her father, David Sanborn, after coming to Galesburg, was engaged in the dry-goods business and later became president of the Second National Bank. He was also prominently connected with public affairs, at one time serving as postmaster of Galesburg, and was active in the establishment of the Burlington railroad. He married Sophie A. Ramsey and continued his residence in Galesburg until his death, which occurred April 9, 1883. Their daughter, Mrs. Churchill, was first married to Albert T. Watkins, who removed from New York to Illinois when twenty years of age and died at the age of thirty years. He was engaged in the grocery business in Galesburg and also owned and operated one of the first presses for baling hay, selling his product to the army during the Civil war. He afterward aided in organizing the Second National Bank and was a very prominent and influential business man and citizen here, but death terminated his career at an early age.
     The death of Dr. Churchill occurred in September, 1899. As a man and citizen he was very popular, readily winning the friendship of those with whom he came in contact while his sterling traits of manhood enabled him to retain their high regard. Added to his keen intelligence and strong manhood was a most amiable and cordial disposition. He was reported as a man of strong character and marked individuality and it was known that his position was never an equivocal one. He was always a friend to the poor and gave generously of his means where assistance was needed. At the age of sixteen years he became a member of the First Congregational church and later placed his membership with its successor, the Central Congregational church. He was a member of the building committee of the new church. From the time that he identified himself with a religious organization he took an active part in church work, serving for fourteen years as deacon, for twenty-five years as superintendent of the Sunday school and for more than a half century as leader of the choir. One of the local papers said: "There is scarcely a department inaugurated for the improvement of the city or for the betterment of the conditions of its people without a trace of his handiwork. He has been part and parcel of the city of Galesburg and of Knox College almost from their inception and his life record is inseparably interwoven with their history." A review of his life indicates that he was ever faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation. (History of Knox County, Vol. II, by A. J. Perry, pages 310-314, submitted by Janine Crandell)

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