Obituaries (N-P)

Jennie Newburg Albert Peterson
Mrs. Ann Norton Carl Oscar Peterson
Oscar Nysbury Charles Peterson
C. G. A. Nystrum Mrs. Ellen Peterson
Thomas O'Brien Grandma Peterson
Franklin Ogden John Peterson
Franklin D. Ogden Pernella Peterson
Jennie Olson Theodore Peterson
John O'Schinski Mrs. Mary Perkins
Joel Overstreet Mrs. Booker Pickrel
Agnes Parkinson Mrs. Mary Jane Pittman
Charles Patch Mrs. Cora Powless
Samuel Patton Dr. George Price
Boy Peterson more to come...

 


Died of Brain Fever
(Knox County Republican, Wednesday, July 30, 1890, submitted by Janine Crandell)

Mr. Joel Overstreet, son of Mr. M. L. Overstreet, of Galesburg, Illinois, died of brain fever, on last Thursday. The funeral services were held at the house on last Saturday. Among those present were many of the country friends of the family. The services were conducted by Rev. J. D. Wyckoff, whose brief remarks contained much that was consoling. The singing was by a quartet, consisting of Miss May Arnold, Mrs. F. W. Stilson, Professor Bently, and Mr. L. H. Jelliff. There were several choice floral tributes. The pall-bearers were Professor George Churchill, Marion Rhodes, Josiah Tilden, D. H. Pankey, I. S. Perkins, and H. C. Bliss. The remains were interred in Hope cemetery.

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A Sad Death
(Knox County Republican, Wednesday, May 21, 1890
, submitted by Janine Crandell)

Mr. Thomas O'Brien, who lives in the northeast part of the township, came to his death in a very sad and sudden manner, on last Saturday. He was returning from Galesburg, and as he, with Mr. John Dulin, arrived at a railroad crossing, a passing freight train frightened his horses. They wheeled around, breaking the buggie tongue and dragged him over the dash board, his neck been broken in the fall. He only lived about fifteen minutes. Mr. O'Brien had been summoned to Peoria in the celebrated twine binder case in which Alderman Parmenter is defendant.

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Died
(Knox County Republican, Wednesday, September 18, 1889
, submitted by Janine Crandell)

Mrs. Pernella Peterson, wife of Nels Peterson, on Broadway, died last Monday night. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon.

(Knox County Republican, Wednesday, September 25, 1889, submitted by Janine Crandell)

Mrs. Pernella Peterson, wife of Nels Peterson, was born in Sweden February 12th, 1823. Came to America 1854, and resided in Knoxville until her death, September 15th, last.

She was a member of the Swedish Lutheran Church and has for a number of years led a Christian life. She longed for her better home, after more than two years suffering. Her last wish was that she would get her children home with her and then she quietly passed over the Jordan to her Promised Land, the day of her wandering being 66 years, 9 months and 4 days. She leaves to mourn her a loving husband, three children and a large number of relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at the Swedish Lutheran Church last Wednesday afternoon.

The family of the deceased are very grateful to the many friends, who so generously gave their assistance during the sickness of the deceased.

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Obituary
(Galesburg Republican-Register, Saturday, August 27, 1887
, submitted by Janine Crandell)

Jennie Newburg, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Newburg, who lived four miles northwest of the city, died Sunday of scarlet fever.

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Obituary
(Galesburg Republican-Register, Saturday, August 27, 1887
, submitted by Janine Crandell)

Carl Oscar, the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Peterson, died Thursday afternoon, aged three years. The little fellow had been ill for two weeks. For a year or two he had been slightly troubled with some brain trouble. His death was a heavy blow to his parents.

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Obituary of Grandma Peterson
(Galesburg Weekly Mail, October 25, 1900, submitted by Todd Walter)

Maquon - The remains of Grandma Peterson were brought here from East Galesburg on Saturday, October 13, where she had died on October 11, at the home of her son, Charles Peterson. She had been poorly for some time and death came to her as a relief as she was quite old and feeble. She leaves a large circle of friends and relatives. There survive her two sons, Charles and Ed, and one daughter, Mrs. Frank Mires.

(I don't know who this is and she has no stone in Maquon Cemetery.)

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Obituary of Mrs. Booker Pickrel
(Galesburg Weekly Republican Register, April 22, 1899, submitted by Todd Walter)

WATAGA - The funeral services of Mrs. Booker Pickrel were held in the Methodist church Friday, Friday April 4. Her remains were laid to rest in the Wataga cemetery. Mrs. Pickrel was an old resident of this place. Her husband died fifteen years ago. She leaves four brothers and three sisters. She was born in Aikens county, Ohio, October 18, 1822, and came to Knox county in 1846. She had resided in Wataga since 1848 and was a member of the M. E. church for fifty nine years. The past four or five years Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Biggerstaff have taken care of her. She had been confined to the house for two years.

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Obituary
(Galesburg's Weekly Republican Register, Saturday, April 2, 1881, page 5, contributed by J. Crandell)

Mrs. Mary Perkins, aged 83 years, who had suffered with cancer of the throat for some time, died Tuesday morning, at 9 o'clock.  She was the mother of Mrs. Nelson Finch, and Mrs. W. A. Boydston.  The funeral took place from the residence of her son, Mr. J. L. Perkins, corner of Cedar and Ferris street, Wednesday afternoon.  The bereaved have the sympathy of their many friends.

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Obituary
(Galesburg's Weekly Republican Register, Saturday, April 16, 1881, pg 8, contributed by J. Crandell)

Wataga: Mrs. Ellen Peterson, wife of Peter E. Peterson, and daughter of Peter Olson, died at her father's Monday morning at 8 o'clock, aged 25 years and eleven months.  After a long and painful illness, the summon came and found her rejoicing that the time of her departure has come, and in the blessed hope that none but the Christian enjoys.  Mr. Peterson, as well

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Obituary
(Galesburg's Register-Mail, Saturday evening, Nov. 5, 1927, contributed by J. Crandell)

Mrs. Pittman: Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Jane Pittman will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the home of her son, Albert Pittman in North Henderson.  Burial will be in the Rice Cemetery.

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Obituary
(Galesburg's Weekly Republican Register, Saturday, April 30, 1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

Altona: A boy of Mr. Peterson, 8 or 10 years old, died last week.

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Obituary
(Galesburg's Weekly Republican Register, Saturday, April 23, 1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

Mr. C. G. A. Nystrum died Tuesday evening of consumption, after a lingering illness.  He was 33 years of age, a member of the Odd Fellows, and an exemplary man.

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Obituary
(Galesburg
Weekly Republican-Register, Saturday, May 21,1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

April 27th, Oscar William Nysbury, age 9 years, 4 months, 23 days.

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Obituary
(Galesburg
Weekly  Republican-Register, Saturday, May 21,1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

At Altona, April 12, Charles Peterson, age 8 years and 11 months.

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Obituary
(Galesburg
Weekly  Republican-Register, Saturday, June 11,1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

Jennie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Olson, died Tuesday night at the age of six years, of brain fever.

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Obituary
(Galesburg
Weekly  Republican-Register, Saturday, June 4,1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

At Galesburg, May 27th, Albert Herman Peterson, Aged 4 years, 8 months and 18 days.

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Obituary
(Galesburg
Weekly  Republican-Register, Saturday, June 4,1881, contributed by J. Crandell)

At Galesburg, May 27th, John G. Peterson, age 38 years and 20 days.

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Obituary
(Galesburg Daily Register Mail, Monday eve., Feb. 27, 1933, pg. 2, contributed by J. Crandell)

     Mrs. Cora Powless, wife of Perry Powless, died at 6:45 Sunday morning at her home, 773 Day street, after a six months' illness. She was born October 12, 1888, in Clay county, near Olney, and attended schools there. She lived here the past sixteen years. Mrs. Powless belonged to the First Christian church and the R. N. A.
     Surviving are her husband, Perry Powless, a son, Ralph, two brothers and two sisters, J. M. Shaw, Wataga; F. E. Shaw, Bement; Mrs. C. A. Jenkins, Olney; Mrs. Sparling, Geneva, Iowa.
     Funeral services will be held at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning from the Dean Funeral Home, in charge of the Rev. S. H. Zendt. Friends may call this evening at the home, 773 Day.

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Obituary
(Galesburg Weekly Republican-Register, March 24, 1888, contributed by J. Crandell)

     Mr. Charles J. Patch, nephew of Mr. W. W. Patch, of this city, died at the home of his uncle, late Tuesday afternoon, of acute peritonitis, after a short illness. The case is in many respects a sad one. Deceased was born in Hanover, New Hampshire, and was about 40 years old. From 1868 to 1871 he was employed on the C. B. & Q. From there he went to Rutland, Vermont, where he remained until six years ago when he removed to Berea, Ohio. There he had charge of the extensive quarry, from which was secured the stone for the new court-house. Upon the breaking out of the strike he came here to serve as engineer on the Burlington. He has been here about 2 1/2 weeks. The exposure, the excitement, and the sudden change in occupation proved, it is thought, too much for his strength, for he was not rugged. A part of the time he had a room at Mrs. Gray's, but since the arrival of his wife on Saturday, had been staying with his uncle. Saturday he complained of a pain in his side and for some days previous to that was not feeling well. Monday noon a physician was called but the symptoms, says Mr. W. W. Patch, were not considered dangerous and it was predicted that he would soon be out again. Tuesday forenoon the pain became more acute and agonizing and when the physician arrived in the afternoon he remarked that even then he was in a dying condition. Mr. Patch leaves a wife and child. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, being Senior Warden of the Berea Lodge, F. & A. M., and Captain of the Host of the Berea Chapter of Royal Arch Masons. Brief funeral services were held Wednesday forenoon at the home of Mr. W. W. Patch and were conducted by Rev. J. W. Bradshaw. The remains were taken to Berea.

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Obituary
(Galesburg
Weekly  Republican-Register, Saturday, July 9,1881, pg. 1, contributed by J. Crandell)

     Dr. George Price died at his home in Abingdon in this county at 1 p. m. Tuesday, after a long and painful illness. Dr. Price was born in Pennsylvania, December 22, 1803. He removed to Ohio in his boyhood and afterwards studied his profession at the medical schools of Cincinnati. In 1848 he came with his family from Ohio and located at Abingdon where he continued to reside to the time of his death. He was for many a ____ physician and skilled surgeon, but ___ ___ failing eyesight he retired from practice some years ago.
     In 1876, the golden anniversary of himself and wife - who survives him - was celebrated at his home in Abingdon. Dr. Price was the father of Dr. M. F. Price and Dr. Curtis E. Price, both surgeons of rank in the U. S. Army and O. F. Price, of this city. He also leaves two daughters surviving - one the wife of Dr. J. B. Mitchell of Colorado and the other the wife of Prof. A. J. Thomson of Abingdon.
     Twenty years no man stood higher in his profession or was better known in this portion of the State than Dr. Price. He was always a friend to the poor and unfortunate, and many times sacrificed his health and comfort to render professional aid to the poor and distressed without fee or hope of pecuniary reward. After a long and useful life, a good man has gone to his reward beyond the river which flows so silently between time and boundless eternity.

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Obituary
(Peoria
Weekly Journal, Thursday, April 26, 1888, contributed by J. Crandell)

Galesburg, Il. April 23 - Late evening about 6 o'clock, John O'Schinski, aged 45 years, and member of the Santa Fe construction gang, shot himself with suicidal intent at Williamsfield, three stations east of this city. Some suspicions of murder are sent out by his friends. The man had considerable money which does not turn up. He died at 6 o'clock this morning. Coroner Knowles is holding an inquest this noon. Advice from it have not reached this city.

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Obituary
(Saline County Independent, Dewitt, Saline County, Nebraska, Friday, June 16, 1899, contributed by Mary Boudreau)

DEATH OF MRS. ANN NORTON END OF A HAPPY AND USEFUL CAREER-HER LIFE SKETCH

Mrs. Ann Norton died at 12:45 o’clock on Tuesday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. G. Burtt, after a long illness. The news was heard with sorrow by a large circle of friends who had learned to love and admire her. She has been in failing health the last year. She suffered greatly from facial neuralgia, the severe pain of which the last two months brought on nervous prostration. During these two months she was confined to the bed. Thursday, May 18, her condition assumed a paralytic form, so affecting her that she could hardly speak. Her son, James, arrived last Friday and her daughter, Mrs. Ryan came Sunday. Thus during the last few days she has had the comfort and consolation of the presence of these children as well as those living here. Mrs. Norton recognized her son James, when he arrived, and called him by name. She appeared to recognize all, but could not speak. During her illness she has had the loving and devoted care of Mrs. Burtt, to whom she was great attached. The Rev. Father Joseph Costa called on her several times and found her reconciled to the thought of death. She received the “Last Blessing” from him Monday. The dying scene was a tender and beautiful one. There were at her bedside Mrs. Burtt, Mrs. Michael O’Connor, a daughter, Mrs. James O’Connor and Miss Minnie O’Connor, a grand daughter and James C. Norton. Prayers for the dying were uttered and Mrs. Norton sank calmly into her peaceful rest. Mrs. Norton was in her 87th year. She was born in Ireland and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Dolan. She was married in that country to James Norton. Sixty-four years ago, with their six children, one a mere babe, they set sail for America. They first settled in Lebanon Springs, N.Y., where they lived for ten years. From there they came direct to Galesburg. For about a year they resided on North Henderson Street, and then moved to a farm west of the city, where they lived for seven years. Mr. Norton then purchased the Center Point farm, known now as the Norton farm, and the family settled there. The husband proved a successful and prosperous farmer. He died twenty-four years ago. For ten years thereafter Mrs. Norton continued to occupy the farm home. At the end of that time she came to Galesburg and since then has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Burtt. Here, with so kind and attentive a daughter, and within easy reach of her other children and her grand children, she has passed a happy old age. She was a devout member of the Corpus Christie church and a member of the Alter society. She was a constant attendant on the church services and not even her rheumatic lameness could prevent her from attending. She was highly respected by acquaintances and to her children was intensely attached. Her home life is especially commended for its faithfulness. During her illness many friends have inquired about her and otherwise shown a deep interest. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Norton. Those surviving are Matthew Norton, East of the city; Mrs. Michael O’Connor Galesburg; Mrs. Edward Ryan, Beaver Crossing, Nebraska; James Norton, DeWitt Nebraska, Charles Norton, North Dakota, and. deceased children: are Patrick, Delia, Kate (Mrs. D. W. Flynn), and John. Mrs. Norton also leaves thirty-six grandchildren, eight great grandchildren and other relatives. Of her father’s family she was the last. The funeral services will be held at 9:30 o’clock a.m. Friday,………….Church of Corpus Christi.—Republican-Register Galesburg, Illinois.

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OBITUARY
(Williamsfield Times, Thursday, Dec. 03 1908, contributed by J. Crandell)

    
Theodore L. Peterson, was born at Center Prairie, this county, on May 18, 1873. While he was a baby his parents removed to the farm they now occupy and there he grew up to manhood--a cheerful, laughing pleasant boy. And all his life long he was cheerful, kindly, accomodating, a good and thoughtful son, a good and thoughtful brother, husband, friend and neighbor.
     On March 27, 1898, he was united in marriage to Miss Edith Larson and they lived a happy life together. For longer than any one knew he had suffered from a serious inward complaint and when, about a fortnight before death, he was attacked by a violent malarial fever he had not the vitality left to fight it off. He passed away in the very noon time of life, but leaves none behind him but friends--and that is a great deal to say. No children came to bless the union, but he leaves a stricken wife, two aged and broken parents and an only brother.

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DEATH OF S. F. PATTON
(Galesburg's Republican-Register, Monday, Feb. 20, 1893, contributed by Mike Osler)

Dies Suddenly Saturday Evening of Heart Disease.

     Mr. Samuel F. Patton, an old and respected resident of Elba township, died suddenly of heart disease Saturday night. Saturday afternoon he was in Knoxville and seemed to be feeling well. He returned home, did his evening’s work about the farm and went to bed about his usual hour. About 10 o’clock his groans brought his wife to him. In a few moments he was dead.
     The funeral services were held at the chapel this morning. The news of his death was sorrowfully received by his many friends in Galesburg.
     The deceased was nearly 54 years old, having been born in Highland county, Ohio, March 13, 1839. When Sam was four years old his parents removed to Illinois, settling in Persifer township in this county, where they purchased a large tract of land. Thus they became one of the Knox county pioneers. Sam was the second of a family of six children, William, Samuel F., James H., Elizabeth S., Hugh T., and John J.
     Sam remained at home with his parents and, with his brother, assisted the father in tilling their land until he was 22. When in 1861 came the call for defenders of the flag. Sam enlisted, joining Company A, 59th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Patton’s army record was an enviable one. He remained with his company until honorably discharged in 1866.
     He fought in the memorable and sanguinary conflicts of Pea Ridge, Ark.; Perryville, Ky.; Stone River, Tenn.; Tullahoma, Tenn.; Chickamauga, Ga.; Lookout Mountain, Tenn.; Missionary Ridge, Tenn., and Ringgold, Ga. Mr. Patton saw sharp service in the Atlanta campaign and was wounded several times, once almost fatally on December 16, 1864. He was in the hospital for about six months, leaving his ward, still a sick and weak man, and returning to his regiment. For his undaunted courage and his gallant conduct he was made a First Lieutenant.
     At the close of the war he returned to Knox county and to his work on the farm. So good a soldier could not make a poor citizen and his fellow citizens elected him sheriff of the county in 1870. Four two years previous to his election he had acted as a deputy sheriff. He made an excellent sheriff and after serving his term of office returned to his former vocation, settling in Copley township where he has since lived.
     The subject of this sketch was married in November, 1871, the bride being Frances Heagy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh D. Heagy, of Knoxville. Their home life has been a happy one.
     The deceased was a man of sturdy character and held the respect and the esteem of a large circle of friends. He has served his township as Assessor, Commissioner of Highways Collector and Justice of the Peace. In politics Mr. Patton was a staunch Republican whose counsels were regarded by the party. He belonged to the Knoxville Post of the G. A. R. and was devoted to that organization and much respected by all his comrades.

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OBITUARY
(Monmouth Review, Dec. 17, 1900, contributed by Pat Thomas)

     Franklin Ogden, one of this county's first settlers, died at 12:15 Friday afternoon in Galesburg. He was 92 years old, living almost through the century just ending. He was a farmer in Berwick township for years, but in 1865 retired and had made his home in Galesburg ever since.
     One year ago the 1st of December he sustained a stroke of paralysis and was confined to his bed for several weeks. Six weeks ago he was taken with another stroke and was not able to leave his bed from that time until his death.
     Franklin Ogden was born near Rome, New York, in Oneida County, 25 July 1803, and was the son of Abraham and Kaziah Ogden. For thirty years he resided there upon the home farm. On 11 October 1832, he was united in marriage to Jane Briggs. Some time later the couple removed to a farm near Wyoming, New York, where they resided for five years. To them were born seven children, of which two survive: Frank D. Ogden, who lives upon his father's old farm, three and one half miles south of Cameron and E. B. Ogden of Cripple Creek, Colorado. In 1847, the wife died in Berwick, Warren county, to which place they had removed in 1839. In that neighborhood, on four different farms, he lived until he removed to Galesburg in 1865.
     To his second wife, Cynthia Richardson Whiting, he was married in August 1851, at Perry, New York. After a year's residence there, he with his family returned to Berwick. A child was born but died in infancy, and the mother survived the child but a few months. In May, 1853, he was married to his third wife, Mrs. Sarah Jane Baker, whose maiden name was Pollack. Thirty five years ago they went to Galesburg, and this present wife survives him.
     When in Berwick he was engaged in the pork packing business before there was a railroad through this section of country, and the first train of freight hauled over the C. B. &Q. consisted of twelve cars of pork packed by him and sent to Chicago from what is now Cameron.
The deceased was a member of the Baptist church, having joined when twenty two years of age, and to the day of his death was one of its most faithful supporters.
     Besides the two children, F. D. Ogden and E. B. Ogden, a sister, Mrs. Harriet Riddle lives at Mattoon, Illinois.
     Funeral services were held from the house Monday morning after which the remains were taken to Berwick.

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OBITUARY
(Unknown newspaper, Feb. 14, 1912, contributed by Pat Thomas)


Franklin D. Ogden

     When his family and friends felt he was improving, after an illness of several weeks, the hand of death was laid upon Franklin Delos Ogden at his home three and a half miles south of Cameron last night at 8:15 and he was called to rest. During the past four weeks, he had been ill, a severe cold causing pleurisy and his heart became weakened. For several days he was known to be in a precarious condition but, for the past day or two, he seemed to be gaining and yesterday his son, Asa, while in this city reported to inquiring friends that his condition was very hopeful.
     Last night however, he weakened and without much warning his heart gave way and death came in a few minutes. He had been resting easily all day and Monday night he slept well. His heart, however, gave way, and he gasped his last breath at 8:15.
     (Eulogy) He was born at Rome, New York, 1 October 1829, and the next year came with his parents to Illinois, settling on what is known as the Huff farm one mile east of Berwick. Here he grew to manhood and while a boy in 1847, united with the Berwick Baptist church and he has held his membership there ever since, always taking an active interest in the work of the church, and being one of its most aggressive members. On 24 March 1865, he was united in marriage to Miss Harriet A. Lewis and to this union seven children were born, all of whom are living. These are Mrs. W. E. Mann, Seymour, Iowa; E. B. Ogden, Galesburg; A. A. Ogden, Cameron; Ralph Ogden, Fort Collins, Colorado; Miss Evelyn Ogden, Cameron; C. L. Ogden, Galesburg, and Mrs. O. A. Capps, Phelps. Mrs. Ogden and the deceased's stepmother, Mrs. Sarah J. Ogden also survive.
      Mr. Ogden has always been a Republican in politics and cast his first vote for John C. Fremont in 1856. Shortly after his marriage in 1863, he and his wife moved to the farm where his death occurred and he has resided there continuously all of the time since.
     Funeral services over the remains will be held on Friday morning at the Baptist church in Berwick and interment will be made at the Berwick cemetery.

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OBITUARY
(Unknown newspaper, June 25, 1928, submitted by Todd Walter)

     Impressive funeral services were held in the Maquon church at 10 o'clock Friday morning for Mrs. Agnes Parkinson. Interment was made in the Maquon Cemetery.
     Mrs. Agnes Tasker Parkinson, daughter of William and Mary Tasker was born in Sussex County, England, July 21st, 1860, and passed away after a few hours illness at her home in Maquon, Monday morning, June 18th, 1928, aged 67 years, 10 months, 27 days.
     Besides her husband she leaves one brother, George of Rapatee, numerous other relatives and a host of friends to mourn her departure. She was confirmed in the Episcopal church of England.
     She was one of a family of twelve children and her early life and school days were lived in England. Her brothers William and Charles had immigrated to America and settled near Maquon. In 1876 her brother Charles went back to England and on May 24th, 1876, (52 years ago) sailed from London, England, with Agnes and her sister Mary, and brought them to the home of their brother, William Tasker.
     March 6th, 1882, she was married to Thomas Baxter Parkinson who had also come from England to make his home. They farmed until about ten years ago when they sold their farm and bought a home in Maquon which they have made a beauty spot in the community.
     She was a faithful member of Bertie Lenore Temple No. 10 Pythian Sisters, a member of the Illini Club and had for many years been the efficient secretary of the Maquon Ladies' Cemetery Association.

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