1879 History of Menard & Mason Counties
Chicago
Published by: O.L. Baskin & Co., Historical Publishers
186 Dearborn Street

Mason County

Organization of Mason County
Page 408

Mason County was formed out of parts of the counties of Menard and Tazewell, and organized in the year 1841. The records of the county are made up in part from Tazewell, Menard and Sangamon. Menard was taken from the northwestern part of Sangamon County and formed into a county in the year 1838. All that portion of territory lying between the Sangamon River and Salt Creek on the south, to the north line of the twentieth tier of townships, including what is now Bath, Lynchburg, Kilbourne, Crane Creek, Salt Creek and Mason City, belonged once to Sangamon-latterly to Menard County-and the remainder of the county, including the present townships of Havana, Sherman, Pennsylvania, Allen's Grove, Manito, Forest City and Quiver belonged to the old county of Tazewell, which contained all the territory north of the line just described, as far east as the west line of McLean County, and as far north as the south line of Putnam County, and bounded on the west by the Illinois River. The original county seat was at Mackinaw, and from thence it was removed to Pekin, and in 1835 was removed to Tremont, and from thence back again to Pekin, where it has been for many years. The towns in old Tazewell were Wesley City, Pekin, Havana and Matanzas, on the river, and Mackinaw, Dillon, Bloomingdale and Washington, in the interior.

Sangamon County was taken from Madison and Bond, and was organized in the year 1821. In the year 1837, it was the largest and most populous county in the State, containing sixty full townships-over 2,000 square miles of territory. At the time of the admission of the State into the Union, there was not a white inhabitant in the whole of Sangamon County, and in 1837 (nineteen years after), the population was estimated at over 20,000. As the capital of the State, the home of Lincoln, Baker, and other illustrious names, old Sangamon is held in a spirit of veneration by people who claim to be her offspring.

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