L. W. Guiteau advertised his new store and stock at the southeast corner of the Public Square.


One of the unique and significant ads of 1847 was that of J. Howe, the hotel man. It follows :


A few travellers can be quietly entertained at Howe's Cottage—with poor fare, at high prices if they come sober and remain so N. B. I want it should be distinctly understood, of all the living beings, a drunkard, to me is the most detestable! I can bear with snakes, toads, hedge-hogs and skunks; because they are as they were created ; but an intelligent human being that will make a brute of him or herself, by intoxicating drink—or those who furnish it to a fellow being, until he or she is intoxicated, and then turn them into the streets to the exposure of the frost, and gaping multitude—I say to such, I have no shelter.             

  J. HOWE.

 

1848, December 13, J. G. Bedee had taken charge of the Stephenson County Hotel. A large addition had been made and fitted up in good style.

Ad: "Winneshiek House. corner Stephenson and Chicago streets, M. M. Woodin."

1848, J. A. Crain and James Schofield were appointed West Point cadets from the 6th district.

January 24, , 1849, J. H. and P. Manny advertised the Manny Harvester in the Freeport Journal. The shop was then conducted at Waddams Grove. "The machine will cut a level swath at any height the man at the wheel may desire. He adjusts the machine to suit the height of the grain. The grain is conveyed by the machine directly to the wagon from the knives as it is cut, or it will leave the grain in the —?— to be bound by hand. Two horses will draw the machine. Fifteen acres can be cut in a day, the machine cutting five feet. It will pass over stumps not over two feet high. The price of a machine is $250.

Threshing Bost 5 cents a bushel in 1848.


Cash paid for hauling wheat to Chicago. 60 teams wanted immediately, for which the highest price will be paid. D. A. Knowlton.


Last Call. All persons indebted to Emmert & Strohm must pay up immediately, or "Fred" or the constable will be after an introduction.


In 1852, the circuit court indicted William Peoples and W. M. Denton for passing counterfeit money and they were sentenced to years imprisonment. Later they were granted a new trial.


Norton's Book Store established a circulating library in 1852.


A large addition to Stephenson County Hotel completed, August, 1849.


A public dinner was served to Hon. Thomas J. Turner, at the Eagle Hotel, April 19, 1849. All were invited. Music was furnished by the Freeport Brass Band. S. D. Carpenter, editor of the Democrat was orator of the day. Mr. Turner responded with an able speech. It was a nonpartisan affair. The committee on arrangements were: A. T. Green, Charles Beth, D. A. Knowlton, F. A. Strocky, M. M. Woodin and Nelson Martin. Mr. E. Torrey was president of the day. Eleven regular toasts were given, after the dinner at the Eagle Hotel and seven volunteer toasts followed.

The Journal, May 23, 1849: "Whig Postmaster at Freeport! It gives us great pleasure to announce the appointment of that staunch and reliable whig, George Reitzell, to the office of postmaster in this village."


In the Journal, November 30, 1848, S. D. Knight calls attention to his store by the following head-lines :"Revolution in Freeport

Emmert & Strohm's ad in 1848, December 13, appealed to young ladies with tendencies toward matrimony. It said: "0, Ladies! Call at Emmert & Strohm's and examine those beautiful toilet articles. Purchase some of those perfumes that tickle so finely the noses of the sterner sex. Heed this advice if you are after a beau, and if you have caught one, heed that you may keep him."

The "Sons of Temperance" held a public meeting in the Presbyterian church, December 15, 1848_ Mr. James Turner and Mr. C A. Clark addressed the meetings.

The third issue of the Freeport Journal, November 30, 1848, made a strong appeal for the establishment of factories. It argued that a county and a city could pot be built up without factories.

The Journal of 1852, September 25, goes hard after Thompson Campbell. It appears that Campbell had pledged 700 abolitionists that he was in favor of prohibiting slavery in the territories, abolishing slavery in the District of Columbia, opposed to admission of Slave States to be made out of Texas or other territory, favors the repeal of the Fugitive Slave Law and urges all constitutional means to restrict the slave trade.


Speaking of the old cemetery the Journal said, June 3, 1850: "A great por­tion of the grounds are unprotected. Not a single tree is there to spread its quiet shades around. There is no fence (except in a few cases) to shield the dust of departed friends from being trampled and torn by the beasts of the field." The edition then urged the building of an iron fence at a cost of $200.00.


Mr. Pells Manny advertised his new self-raker, drop reaper and clipper February, 1850. The drop became the usual reaper till the binder was perfected many years later.


Dr. J. V. H. Judd located permanetly in Freeport in 1850.

Folloch, the barber, advertised in 1850, "That ladies could have their heads shampooed at home if they wished and that gentlemen who were being shaved by the month or quarter would be furnished with a lather box and brush exclusively for their own use."

John L. Burgers, a son of W. L. Burgers of Rock Run, was bitten by a poisonous snake, June 15, 1850. The poison spread rapidly through his sys­tem and he died in eleven hours

.
Godey's Lady's Book was the "Ladies Home Journal" of 1850.

Raymond Co.'s extenstive menagerie, being the largest and rarest collection of wild beasts, birds and reptiles, will exhibit at Freeport, Saturday, July 13, 1850. Admission 25 cents.

In 1850, Rev. Parker for the Presbyterian and Rev. DeVore for the Methodists held big revival meetings in Freeport.


The Messrs. Stowell of Waddams Grove, invented and manufactured a sod fence machine. They claimed it would be possible to build a mile of fence per day. The machine was drawn by oxen and cut the sod in strips and laid it up in a durable fence. Four men and five yoke of oxen were required to operate the machine.

 

1852

Mr. Crouse of Ohio took charge of the Winneshiek House in July, 1852.

Barna T. Stowell, Esq., of Waddams Grove, invented a self-loading and dumping cart, which he exhibited, July 19, 1852. The machine worked admirably and fulfilled the most sanguine expectations of the inventor.


Spalding and Roger's North America Circus showed in Freeport, August 24, 1852.

The Journal of June to, 1850, says, "Last year (1849) the population of Freeport was 1,020 This year a census has been taken and shows an increase of 480, making the population 1,500. Sixty new dwelling houses have been begun this spring.


The Journal's circulation in 1851 was 323 and that of the Prairie Democrat was 348, both weeklies.


In July, 1851, both the Democrat and the Journal had long discussions on the short dress and "bloomer costume" that were then trying to become the vogue.

The Freeport Temperance Society was organized at the Baptist church, July It, 1851.
In 1851, a movement was under way to build a plank road from Freeport to Monroe, Wisconsin. That would bring the trade of southern Wisconsin to Freeport and then to Chicago, via the coming railroad.


Brewster & Wheeler's nursery had 150,000 trees in 1851.


In J. H. Manny's ad for his reapers and mowers, September 12, 1851, were the endorsements of almost too citizens of Stephenson County.
Journal, October 3, 1851 "Psychology. —A fellow calling himself Dr. Dennis, has been endeavoring to lecture to some of our citizens for several evenings on this humbug Science."


A. H. Wise advertised the "Kossuth Hack" from Freeport to the railroad in 1852.


March 19, 1852, there was held in Freeport an Irish patriot mass meeting. The meeting was held in the courthouse for the purpose of making a demonstration in behalf of Smith O'Brien, John Mitchel and other Irish exiles and prisoners. Thomas Egan was chairman and Phillip Hogan, vice president; and Edward Burke, secretary. A committee on resolutions was appointed and H. Bright addressed the meeting.


In June, 1852, Mease & Ely opened a new steam flouting mill in Freeport.


A terrific storm passed through Oneco Township in June, 1852, blowing down John Sheckard's barn, tore up trees, scattered grain and killed hogs, sheep and calves.

Emmert & Burrell ran a soda fountain in 1854-5.


A Mr. Walker who quarreled with his wife and step-son suicided April, 1855, by jumping into the Pecatonica River.

W. C. Clark took charge of the Clark House June, 1855. It was the old Stephenson House remodeled.

Journal, 1855, June 7: "Freeport receives and sells more merchandise than Rockford and does a better railroad business than Rockford

The Freeport Union Chorus Society gave a concert at Plymouth Hall December 31, 1855

.
Hugh Jones was found frozen to death in Silver Creek Township, January 2, 1856. He was intoxicated and lost his way while returning ftom Freeport.

The following were elected supervisors, April, 1854:
Harlem ................................................... William Buckley.
West Point ...............................................M Lawyer.
Silver Creek ............................................ M. Hettinger.
Lancaster.................................................V.Hemmeuway.
Buckeye                                                    F. Bolender.
Loran........................................................G.W. Andrews.
Florence .................................................. L.Lee.
Rock Grove ............................................ John Voght.
Waddams ............................................... Levi Robey.
Rock Run ............................................... J.A. Davis.
Oneco ....................................................Andrew Hines.
Ridott .....................................................G.A. Farwell.
Erin ........................................................Wm. Goddard.
Winslow ................................................ B.Sweeley.
Freeport ............................................... A.W. Rice.

In 1854 the following erected new buildings in Freeport: Judge Farwell, Martin & Karcher, Mitchell & Putnam and E. H. Hyde. The building of the last named gentleman included a public hall.

In February, 1855, a deep snow fell. The Journal says that only four mails were received from the east in two weeks

Ryrnal & Wilmot employed about 25 men in 1854, manufacturing plows. The annual output was Loon plows.

Horace Mann gave two lectures in Freeport under the auspices of the Literary Institute, March 21, 4854.

In 1855, N. W. Edwards, the first superintendent of schools, made a tour of inspection of schools in Stephenson County.

The Journal, September 2, 1852, gives great praise to the Teacher's Institute held at the Union school.

The Journal, 1855, October 25, announces the law partnership formed by T. J. Turner and H. C. Burchard, "the late popular principal of the Union school." The Journal paid Mr. Burchard a high compliment and prophesied his success at the bar.

A person well qualified to teach in the common school will find employment for the coming winter by applying soon. Inquire of Jared Sheetz, James Hart or George Miller. Directors of District No. 2, five miles west of Freeport.


In October, 1849, J. H. Schlott and Jacob Stibgen began the manufacture of the J. C. Miller & Co. grain drills at Freeport. The drill was a two horse simple affair and sowed five rows

.
Crane & Co.'s circus exhibited in town last Tuesday, said the Journal, August 8, 1849.

Journal, August 15, 1849: "Somebody has sheared the mane and tail of Mr.Jones' horse, whereas.

 

History of Stephenson County-1880

 

 

 

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